Nanocrystals selfpurification mechanisms explained by energetics

first_imgIn an example of doped nanocrystals, this charge density plot shows magnesium impurities in cadmium-selenium nanocrystals at two different gap levels: (a) resonant and (b) hybrid. Image credit: Gustavo Dalpian and James Chelikowsky. On the macroscale, doping led to the transistor. On the nanoscale, scientists believe that doping could lead to an assortment of technologies, including solar cells, electroluminescent devices and electronic devices. Doping, which means adding impurities containing electrons, can enable electric conductance in a controlled way. But the miniscule size of semiconductor nanocrystals – also described as one-dimensional “quantum dots” – means that scientists must explore new methods for doping. Because nanocrystals have very little interior volume and are virtually all surface, scientists in the past believed that inner impurities can easily migrate the short distance to the surface and be ejected. “People used to believe that nanocrystals had fewer defects due to their limited size,” explains Gustavo Dalpian, coauthor with James Chelikowsky of a recent publication in Physical Review Letters on the energetics of doping. “People believed that defects could be annealed away from the nanocrystal in an easy way due to its limited size. After a few jumps, the impurity will be out of the nanocrystal.”In 2005, scientists (Erwin et al.) proposed that the difficulties in doping nanocrystals could be explained by the crystals’ surface topology and how easily impurities could bind to the surface. For these reasons, these scientists determined that the smaller the size of a nanocrystal, the less binding energy, and the more difficult doping becomes.Dalpian and Chelikowsky, from the University of Texas, have shown that understanding doping in semiconductor nanocrystals requires an understanding of both kinetic and thermodynamic/energetic properties. By explaining nanocrystals’ tendency toward self-purification in terms of the energy needed to form impurities in nanocrystals, the scientists hope to find new ways to increase the dopability of these materials.“Annealing was basically a kinetic argument,” Dalpian said to PhysOrg.com. “[Erwin et al.] show that, changing their solution to an anion-rich (negatively-charged) environment, they could put more impurities into the nanocrystals. Their argument was that there is a shape change in their nanocrystal that increases the binding energy of the impurity into the surface. We show that the difficulty of nanocrystal doping can also be explained through energetic arguments: when you change the solution to an anion-rich environment, the formation energy of the defects is decreased. Explore further ‘Nanocrystal doping’ enhances semiconductor nanocrystals Citation: Nanocrystals’ ‘self-purification’ mechanisms explained by energetics (2006, June 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-06-nanocrystals-self-purification-mechanisms-energetics.htmlcenter_img “In principle, an energetic argument should be better because it is simpler:” he continued. “To discuss kinetics, one needs energy barriers, diffusion coefficients, exact shape of the nanocrystal, etc. However, in our model, supposing the system is under thermodynamic equilibrium, we just need the formation energy of the defect.” When an impurity enters a nanocrystal, a level is created in the gap of the nanocrystal, which (along with structural properties) affects the formation energy of the impurity. Dalpian and Chelikowsky found that a defect’s structural properties do not depend on nanocrystal size, but that the level in the gap is deeper (energy difference is larger) for smaller nanocrystals. “Suppose you have two different systems that create levels in the gap, and one is deeper than the other,” said Dalpian. “If you want to populate these levels (put electrons on them), it will cost more energy to populate the one that is deeper. That is why it costs more energy to put impurities in the small nanocrystals than the larger ones: the level created in the gap is filled and is deeper for smaller nanocrystals.”Because smaller nanocrystals contain deeper impurity levels, more energy is required for doping and the lower the population of defects. This explanation supports the idea that self-purification is an intrinsic property of nanocrystals, but also a property that can be overcome.“In order to make doping easier, we also propose that the sample should be grown in an anion-rich solution,” said Dalpian. “Since manganese impurities like to go to the cation (positively-charged) site in cadmium-selenium nanocrystals, a lot of cations create ´competition´ between the impurities and the cadmium (a cation precursor) to occupy the cation site. In an anion-rich environment (the other thermodynamic limit), you have a lot of selenium (an anion precursor) and a deficiency of cadmium, reducing the competition between impurities and cadmium, and making it more likely for the impurities to go to the cadmium site.”Citation: Dalpian, Gustavo M., and Chelikowsky, James R. Self-purification in Semiconductor Nanocrystals. Physical Review Letters 96, 226802 (2006)By Lisa Zyga, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Doping semiconductor nanocrystals will likely provide a basis for a wide variety of nano applications. But since the tiny nanocrystals tend to repel impurities, scientists must first find a way to overcome nanocrystals’ “self-purification” mechanisms and exploit them for doping. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

EPaper Technology Has New Possibilities in Japan

first_img RFID tags deliver letters safely to destination The Toppan Printing Company offered the e-paper displays to the Ministry of Internal Affairs and the Communications Kanto Bureau of Telecommunications. Field testing was performed by having them displayed inside the Toshima Post Office and Higashi-Ikebukuro bus stop. The electronic paper installed inside the Toshima Post Office measured approximately 3.28 feet by 10.5 feet. The e-paper display featured 240 x 768 pixels with a pixel pitch of 4mm. This pixel arrangement was made by arranging 48 x 96-pixel electronic papers in eight horizontal rows and five vertical rows.At the Higashi-Ikebukuro bus stop a smaller display was used measuring approximately 2 feet by 1.3 feet. The e-paper display featured 144 x 96 pixels with a pixel pitch of 4mm. This display was created by arranging pieces of 48 x 96-pixel electronic paper in three vertical rows.The e-paper display in Toshima Post Office will be remaining on display until Jan 29, 2009. The testing is also serving as a promotion for the Toppan Printing Company in using electronic paper for digital signage. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: E-Paper Technology Has New Possibilities in Japan (2009, January 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-01-e-paper-technology-possibilities-japan.htmlcenter_img Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — On January 23, 2009 e-paper testing was started in Japan around Toshima Ward Office, which is just east of JR Ikebukuro Station. A wireless network was set up at the Toshima Life and Industry Plaza and served as the emergency hub for disseminating disaster information. The test was to see how effective an e-paper display system would be in case of a local disaster.last_img read more

Will carbon nanotubes replace indium tin oxide

first_img Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — Up until now, George Grüner tells PhysOrg.com, most of the studies regarding the properties – and uses – of carbon nanotubes have been restricted to the visible spectral range. “We, however, were interested in the properties in infrared range, in the window of the electromagnetic spectrum that is gaining increased prominence.” Carbon nanotubes made into conductive, flexible ‘stained glass’center_img Citation: Will carbon nanotubes replace indium tin oxide? (2009, March 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-03-carbon-nanotubes-indium-tin-oxide.html Grüner, a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, worked with Liangbing Hu and David S. Hecht to explore the infrared properties of thin films made with carbon nanotubes. Their work demonstrated that carbon nanotubes are highly transparent in the infrared range. “This attribute would make such films ideal replacement for indium tin oxide,” Grüner says. Their work can be found in Applied Physics Letters: “Infrared transparent carbon nanotube thin films.”“Finding transparent metals, which are ideal materials for use in such technologies as touch screens and solar cells, is not easy thing to do. Indium tin oxide, ITO, is predominantly used,” Grüner explains. However, ITO is rather brittle and the indium used in the alloy is becoming scarce. Scientists have discovered that films of carbon nanontubes are conductive and sufficiently transparent in the visible range, offering the potential to replace indium tin oxide.While finding a replacement for indium tin oxide for applications that make use of visible light is significant, Grüner and his colleagues were more interested in whether or not carbon nanotube thin films could be useful in the infrared range as well. “ITO is not much transparent in the infrared range,” Grüner says, “so there are some applications that wouldn’t be suited for.” “A range of applications are making use of the infrared range,” Grüner continues. “Military applications would benefit greatly, especially in terms of infrared sensors, cameras and projectors.” Additionally, making effective use of the infrared range could also lead to more efficient solar cells. “A significant fraction of the radiation from the sun is in the infrared range. As mentioned, ITO, used as electrodes in solar cells is not transparent at infrared, this leads to decreased efficiency. Carbon nanotube thin films are transparent in the infrared range, this could help developing more efficient solar energy.”In order to test the abilities of the carbon nanotubes, Grüner and his students set up an experiment to direct infrared light through the thin film they had prepared. By measuring the intensity on the other side of the film, they were able to gauge its transparency. “It’s really pretty straightforward,” Grüner says. “The art is really making a well conducting film.”Grüner points out that such films are more transparent than other materials showing good optical transparency is the visible spectral range. “That came as a bit of a surprise,” he acknowledges. “This opens up a number of interesting opportunities for a variety of applications,” Grüner says. “We are looking forward to seeing if what we have found will finds it’s way into useful applications.”More information: Hu, Hecht and Grüner. “Infrared transparent carbon nanotube thin films,” Applied Physics Letters (2009). Available online: link.aip.org/link/?APPLAB/94/081103/1. Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.last_img read more

Nokia prototype twist bend tap steal show w video

first_img The prototype has an OLED display. A user can get in and out by bending the handset back and forth. The user can manage menus by twisting and bending the device in different directions. In so many words, Nokia’s think squad has imagined a mobile device that can behave according to how it is flexed.The prototype demonstrated at Nokia World is from the Nokia Research Center (NRC). “The demo shows how intuitive and simple user interactions can be just by bending and twisting,” says the Center’s notes. The NRC also points out that Nokia is nowhere near the suggestion that the new screen invention is to replace the standard touchscreen. Instead, the concept is intended to suggest another option. As options go, the device is seen as useful for certain circumstances. Those include very cold climates where touchscreens may not be easily operated. The device can work even when a person is wearing gloves.Yet another talking point in this week’s reports on the prototype is that it is a potentially useful device for the blind. One can get the device to work without having to look at it. The bending properties don’t need vision. Citation: Nokia prototype: twist, bend, tap, steal show (w/ video) (2011, October 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-10-nokia-prototype-video.html This is not the last innovation we are likely to see in mobile device designs. The prototype is the latest in a succession of concepts that seek to enhance the mobile experience. As computing gets more mobile it clearly gets more inventively tactile. Innovative ways of handling smartphones, tablets, and other devices always draw crowds. Some observers at the London show noted the past interest in the introduction of the Synapse concept phone with squeeze sensors. This was demonstrated as a phone that the user can control by squeezing the sides or running a finger across a touchpad on the backside. Fuse was announced as a collaboration between Synaptics, Texas Instruments, Alloy, Immersion, and The Astonishing Tribe.The Nokia demo appears as something that could be applied to smartphones as well as tablets. The demo’s screen size was a little less than five inches.Asked when the device will be brought to market, the answer from the company representative was a vague, “Soon” but quickly followed by the comment, “It depends on how big the demand is in the market.” Still, those who have seen the device at the Nokia event or watched the videos generally agree that the time spent was fun and worthwhile, as the concept is a reminder of all the future innovations in mobile technology still in the wings. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Nokia N80 gets best in mobile image devicecenter_img (PhysOrg.com) — The talk of the Nokia Show in London this week was a demo that had admiring visitors wishing the little device was beyond Cool-Idea Prototype and instead a launch with dates in place for stores and online shopping sites. The mind-bender, though not fully baked, is a hand-bender, namely a flexible kinetic device. The Nokia prototype allows the user to do tasks like pan through photos, zoom in and out, select and pause music, all by twisting, bending, bowing, and tapping the corners of the device. The prototype is, for now, simply named Nokia kinetic device. © 2011 PhysOrg.com Explore furtherlast_img read more

Quantum physicist explains 100K offer for proof scaledup quantum computing is impossible

first_imgScott Aaronson Citation: Quantum physicist explains $100K offer for proof scaled-up quantum computing is impossible (2012, February 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-02-quantum-physicist-100k-proof-scaled-up.html (PhysOrg.com) — MIT researcher Scott Aaronson has certainly riled the physics community with his offer this past Friday, of $100,000 to anyone who can prove that scaled-up quantum computing is impossible. His original reason for doing so was, as he describes in his blog, due to adding his two cents to an argument between skeptic Gil Kalai and researcher Aram Harrow about assumptions regarding the Quantum Fault-Tolerance Theorem, on another blog, where he argued that refuting the idea of scalable quantum computing would amount to more than just taking apart the QFT Theorem; it would he suggested, mean coming up with a new version of physical reality. Then, because of the response he got from the blog owner, he felt compelled to defend his assertions in a rather bold and some might say, foolhardy way. Thus was born the $100,000 bet, or prize. Explore further Now, after some time has passed and many hundreds of comments posted, Aaronson has posted to IEEE Spectrum, about the deeper reasoning behind the prize offer.First he answers a query from IEEE’s Rachel Courtland, who wants to know why the possibility of a scaled up quantum computer has come up, and why does there need to be a prize about it?From his answer it appears it’s because, as a quantum physicist whose goal is to find a way to create a scaled up quantum computer, he gets an awful lot of comments on his blog questioning his career choice in light of the fact that there is no certainty that his goal is even achievable. Many of the posts have clearly irked him and he now in response, appears to be hoping that his daring those who throw stones from afar, will either pipe down, or simply go away. Or, perhaps, miraculously free him from his dream by proving that it’s an impossible one that will lead him and the rest of his colleagues to eventual embarrassment.It’s clear that Aaronson believes a means of building a true scaled up quantum computer will be found one day, and that the problem at this juncture, as Courtland points out, is more one of pouring additional resources into figuring out how to make it happen, rather than sitting around wondering if it’s possible. He points out that as everyone in the small community of quantum physicists knows, tiny quantum computers have already been built that can perform small, rather insignificant operations; hence the need for the “scalable” part of the prize. To win the money, someone would need to prove that what has been done so far, will never be done on a larger scale, i.e. building a quantum computer that can actually do useful stuff.It’s all a matter of decoherence he says, where the quantum parts of the computer must of necessity interact with those that are not. Thus, the issue is whether that one little problem can ever be overcome. He clearly thinks it can, while others think not. Aaronson just wants them to back up their reasoning with actual science.center_img Researchers conduct experimental implementation of quantum algorithm © 2011 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Researchers devise a means to obtain abnormal grain growth in metal using

first_img More information: Abnormal Grain Growth Induced by Cyclic Heat Treatment, Science 27 September 2013: Vol. 341 no. 6153 pp. 1500-1502 DOI: 10.1126/science.1238017ABSTRACTIn polycrystalline materials, grain growth occurs at elevated temperatures to reduce the total area of grain boundaries with high energy. The grain growth rate usually slows down with annealing time, making it hard to obtain grains larger than a millimeter in size. We report a crystal growth method that employs only a cyclic heat treatment to obtain a single crystal of more than several centimeters in a copper-based shape-memory alloy. This abnormal grain growth phenomenon results from the formation of a subgrain structure introduced through phase transformation. These findings provide a method of fabricating a single-crystal or large-grain structure important for shape-memory properties, magnetic properties, and creep properties, among others. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. It’s the fineness of the grind Journal information: Science Citation: Researchers devise a means to obtain abnormal grain growth in metal using cyclic heat treatment (2013, September 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-09-abnormal-grain-growth-metal-cyclic.htmlcenter_img (Phys.org) —A team of researchers from Tohoku University and Kyoto University in Japan has found a way to cause abnormal grain growth in metal crystals using cyclic heat treatment. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they came up with the approach, how well it works and how it might be used in future applications. © 2013 Phys.org In the never ending struggle to develop more kinds of metals that are suitable for a larger variety of purposes, scientists have studied the very nature of metals to better learn how it is they perform the way they do under different circumstances. Creating them one way, for example, results in a highly bendable but relatively weak metal—creating them another way can produce just the opposite. As part of the research involving metals, scientists have discovered that metals hold their shape in ways that are very similar to ceramics—it’s all based on crystal formation and how the crystals bind to one another.With metals, crystals bond together where they interface, known in the trade as the Grain Boundary (GB). Treating the metal can cause changes to the boundary which in turn impacts the properties of the finished product. Unfortunately, working with metals is still oftentimes more art than science—how grain boundaries form and impact interactions between crystals is still not wholly understood. What is known is that applying heat can cause the GB to stretch, causing longer grain formation—the result is a metal that can better endure multiple bends. Unfortunately, adding heat can only go so far, which is why researchers continue to look for ways to change the GB to add more desirable properties to metals.In this new effort, the researchers tried a cycling method—applying heat, allowing for cooling, then reapplying for as many times as appears to be beneficial. They applied the heat cycling to a copper based shape-memory alloy (metal that has been developed to revert automatically back to its original shape under certain specified conditions). Doing so they found, resulted in what metallurgists call Abnormal Grain Growth (AGG) which is where some of the crystals grow to different sizes than their neighbors. When it occurs in beneficial ways, as it did in the researchers experiment, it can result in the development of much longer grains, which translate to more robust metals.The researchers believe their technique might be used to create alloys with longer service lives and also may serve as the jumping off point for a whole new line of research, dedicated to better understanding the relationship between grain size as it relates to GB and the way it is changed with heat. The microstructure of a Cu-Al-Mn alloy with simple isothermal heat treatment and cyclic heat treatment. Credit: Science 27 September 2013: Vol. 341 no. 6153 pp. 1500-1502 DOI: 10.1126/science.1238017last_img read more

Using magnets to control chemical reactions that target release of medicines inside

first_img(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the University of Georgia in Athens has developed a technique for controlling chemical reactions that release drugs inside the body. In their paper published in the journal Nature Catalysis, the group describes coating chemicals to prevent a reaction from occurring until the application of a magnetic field that releases a desired drug. In some medical applications, it is better for a medical treatment if a chemical can be applied directly to a certain part of the body and nowhere else. Chemicals meant to treat tumors are the prime example—chemotherapy drugs act on every cell they contact, causing a host of negative side effects. In this new effort, the group took a novel approach to solving this problem, using a magnet to force coated chemicals together, prompting a drug releasing reaction.To provide a means for controlling when chemicals come into contact inside the body, the researchers created tiny packets by first coating iron oxide nanoparticles with silica and then coating them further with two types of polymers, which, when combined, form a brush-like structure. Each of the packets was then loaded with either an enzyme or a substrate meant to react with the enzyme, and, of course, the drug to be released. In practice, the packets would be released into the body of a patient, where they would make their way to the whole body, behaving harmlessly, as the brushes prevent them from reacting whenever they meet. When the packets made their way to a site where a reaction was wanted, the researcher applied a magnet that forced them close together—close enough that they could react, releasing the drug. The other packets not involved in the reaction would slowly be flushed out of the body naturally, without causing harm.The researchers tested their packets in vitro using a real chemotherapy drug and cancer cells. They report it worked just as they had envisioned. More testing is required, of course, to ensure the technique is safe, but if all goes well, it could eventually be used to treat a wide variety of cancers. Multi stimuli-responsive nanocapsules selectively deliver drugs to exactly where they are needed Journal information: Nature Catalysis Explore further E- and S-type superparamagnetic nanoparticles carrying the enzyme and the substrate. a,b, Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) image (a) and schematic (b) explaining the concept of the magnetic-field-triggered biocatalysis. The particle superparamagnetic core is made of Fe3O4 nanoparticles enveloped by silica. The silica envelope is labelled with covalently bound fluorescent dyes (red for E-particles and green for S-particles). In the magnetic field, due to dipole–dipole interactions, the particles are brought into contact, so that the brush-like double-layer shells merge and intertwine, enabling interactions between the enzyme and substrate. The inner layers of the brush-shell are made of polyacrylic acid (PAA), which carries conjugated molecules of enzymes and substrates and provides the acidic environment for hydrolytic reactions. The external shell of poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether acrylate) polymer (PPEGMA) secures a barrier function to block ‘unauthorized’ or premature reactions of the enzyme and the substrate. The biocatalytic reaction is localized within the biocatalytic nanocompartment, which is generated in the magnetic field. The reaction is monitored by detecting the released cargo molecules. Credit: (c) Nature Catalysis (2017). DOI: 10.1038/s41929-017-0003-3center_img More information: Andrey Zakharchenko et al. Magnetic field remotely controlled selective biocatalysis, Nature Catalysis (2017). DOI: 10.1038/s41929-017-0003-3AbstractMany applications for medical therapy, biotechnology and biosensors rely on efficient delivery and release of active substances. Here, we demonstrate a platform that explores magnetic-field-responsive compartmentalization of biocatalytic reactions for well-controlled release of chemicals or biological materials on demand. This platform combines two different kinds of core–shell magnetic nanoparticle: one loaded with enzymes and another with substrate-bound therapeutic (bio)chemicals. Both cargos are shielded with a polymer brush structure of the nanoparticle shell, which prevents any enzyme–substrate interactions. The shield’s barrier is overcome when a relatively weak (a fraction of 1 T) external magnetic field is applied and the enzyme and the substrate are merged and forced to interact in the generated nanocompartment. The merged biocatalytic nanoparticles liberate the substrate-bound therapeutic drugs when the enzymes degrade the substrate. The developed platform provides a proof of concept for the remotely controlled release of drugs or (bio)chemicals using the energy of a non-invasive, weak magnetic field. © 2017 Phys.org Citation: Using magnets to control chemical reactions that target release of medicines inside the body (2017, November 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-11-magnets-chemical-reactions-medicines-body.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Bengal BJP targeting 22 Lok Sabha seats ahead of 2019 polls

first_imgKolkata: The state BJP is targeting 22 Lok Sabha seats where election will be held in 2019. The 22 seats cover 154 Assembly constituencies and every Assembly segment will be placed under a state leader. This was decided at a meeting held between state president Dilip Ghosh and national president Amit Shah.Though BJP has finished the race in three-tier Panchayat election as a distant second, the party’s leaders at both national and local levels have expressed satisfaction over the performance of the party in Purulia and Junglemahal. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsIt has been decided that special drives will be conducted in these two districts. Various NGOs, without holding any party flag, will go to these districts to distribute books and clothes to the students.It has been learnt that RSS workers are secretly running schools in Jhargram and they have brainwashed not only the students but their parents as well and convinced them that the projects taken up by the state government to develop the district are actually Central government projects.Some local CPI-M cadres have also joined them to disturb peace in Belpahari, Binpur and Lalgarh, where peace has been restored by the efforts of Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee.last_img read more

Members of two Purulia families join Trinamool

first_imgKolkata: The members of two families from Purulia whose houses were visited by BJP national president Amit Shah on Thursday, joined Trinamool Congress on Friday.Sishubala Rajghar and her son Sanjay and Astami Rajghar and her son Puchu, came to the Trinamool office in Kolkata and joined the party.Dr Santanu Sen, Trinamool Congress Rajya Sabha MP, said that the families from Labda village are not associated with BJP in any way. On Thursday, Shah, along with other BJP leaders, went to their house and spent some time there. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killed”They got frightened after Shah and his team left and without wasting any time, they left for Kolkata. As they saw Abhishek Banerjee, the party’s Youth Congress president in a meeting, they came to Kolkata and took shelter in the party office,” said Sen.Sen said the persons are apolitical and over the past eight years, they have seen major changes taking place in the area, following the initiative taken by Mamata Banerjee.”The roads have improved and people are getting power and drinking water. People had been deprived of basic amenities in the past 34 years under the CPI-M rule. Children are going to school,” he maintained.Local people said the families had shifted to BJP recently. Their relatives still support BJP. On Thursday, some BJP leaders, along with Shah, visited their houses and stayed there for five minutes.Trinamool leaders alleged that BJP had brainwashed the poor people by making false promises and during the Panchayat election, they spent money to win four Gram Panchayats and Panchayat Samitys in Purulia.last_img read more

Mamata to inaugurate Rath Yatra festival today

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee will inaugurate the Rath Yatra festival organised by ISKCON on Saturday morning.There will be different functions at the temple premises. She will be inaugurating the Rath Yatra and at around 1 pm, it will start moving ahead from Hungerford Street and pass through AJC Bose Road, Sarat Bose Road, Hazra Road, SPM Road, ATM Road, Chowringhee, Exide Crossing, Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Outram Road to reach Brigade Parade Ground. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThousands of people will be turning up to take part in the Rath Yatra. People from different walks of life will start pouring into the city from Saturday morning itself to attend the biggest Rath Yatra festival in Kolkata. The police have also made an elaborate arrangement to avoid any untoward incident during the Rath Yatra festival on Saturday. Steps have also been taken to ensure that no traffic congestion happens when the Rath passes through the important thoroughfares. The top brass of the Kolkata Police have held a meeting in this connection and chalked out a plan to divert vehicles through other roads. Additional policemen will be on-duty for the security of the devotees who will take part in the Rath Yatra. Policemen in plainclothes and women cops will also be deployed. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPThe chariot will be staying at Brigade Parade Ground till July 13 and people can visit to offer prayers to Lord Jagannath, Balaram and Subhadra. There will also be a fair at the ground on the eve of Rath Yatra. It is on July 22 noon that the festival of Ulta Rath Yatra will start. The Rath will be brought back to the temple through Outram Road near Park Street Metro, Jawaharlal Nehru Road, Dorina Crossing, S N Banerjee Road, Moulali Crossing, CIT Road, Suhrawardy Avenue, Park Circus 7 Point Crossing, Shakespeare Sarani and Hungerford Street. The Rath Yatra will be celebrated across the state on Saturday with great pomp and show where lakhs of devotees will gather at Mahesh in Hooghly.last_img read more