Ohio Farm Bureau Podcast Directory

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio Farm Bureau produces regular audio content that is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.Town Hall Ohio is a weekly public affairs radio program. The hour-long broadcast elevates important issues such as private property rights, food safety, wildlife, education, science and technology, business challenges, government and politics. High profile guests from government, industry, academia and other arenas are regular guests on the program.  Policy Counsel Leah Curtis discusses topics impacting farmers and landowners such as property rights, taxes and other legal and regulatory issues. Director of Water Quality and Research Jordan Hoewischer hosts conversations with experts and leaders who are helping to shape and secure the future of Ohio’s ag industry for generations to come. Hear from Ohio Farm Bureau staff experts on a range of topics impacting Ohio farmers and landowners.last_img read more

Songs for Christmas 2016

first_imgDonald Trump’s SongOh, the weather outside is frightful,But the new AC is delightful,I’ll tell you what I’ve always felt:Let it melt! Let it melt! Let it melt!Polar bears these days are thinkingThat the ice cap seems to be shrinking,I’ll tell you what I’ve always felt:Let it melt! Let it melt! Let it melt!The heat shows no signs of stopping,And the corn in the fields is popping,I’ll tell you what I’ve always felt:Let it melt! Let it melt! Let it melt!We expect a most wild ride,Because it’s so hot outside,I’ll tell you what I’ve always felt:Let it melt! Let it melt! Let it melt! I’m Dreaming of a Cold ChristmasI’m dreaming of a cold ChristmasJust like the ones we used to know,With pies on the tableAnd a climate that’s stableAnd snowmen made of real snow.I’m dreaming of a cold ChristmasJust like the ones in years gone by,With fewer forest fires,And leaders who weren’t liars,When warm weather didn’t make us cry.I’m dreaming of a cold ChristmasWith every Christmas card I writeWith temps (please!) in a normal range —And no threat of rapid climate change. Donald Trump Is Coming To TownYou better watch outYou folks at DOE,You better not pout,Because, you’ll see:Donald Trump is coming to town.He’s making a listAnd checking it twice;He’s gonna find outWho’s naughty or nice:Donald Trump is coming to town.You’re thinking of retiring?And how you want to time it?Well, Trump will soon be… Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberscenter_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.last_img read more

2017 Youth Trans Tasman Referee Appointments

first_imgRelated LinksYTT Referee Appointments Congratulations to the following referees who received appointments at the 2017 Youth Trans Tasman.Game 1: Friday 20 January 201718 Mixed: John Wright, Luke Saldern and Dai Tui Taylor18 Women’s: Chris Schwerdt, Henri Labuschagne and Brian Blechynden18 Men’s: Luke Heckendorf, John Dustow and Anthony Smith20 Mixed: Rob Bowen, George Haswell and Tony Calabria20 Women’s: Alisha Ruaiti, Logan Forrester and Amanda Sheeky20 Men’s: Luke McKenzie, Cameron MacDonald and Richie HeapGame 2: Saturday 21 January 201718 Mixed: Logan Forrester, Brian Blechynden and Luke Saldern18 Women’s: Dali Tui Taylor, Henri Labuschange and John Wright18 Men’s: Luke Heckendorf, John Dustow and Chris Schwerdt 20 Mixed: Rob Bowen, George Haswell and Anthony Smith20 Women’s: Tony Calabria, Alisha Ruaiti and Amanada Sheeky20 Men’s: Luke McKenzie, Cameron MacDonald and Richie Heap Game 3: Sunday 22 January 201718 Mixed: Logan Forrester, Brian Blechynden and Luke Saldern18 Women’s: Dali Tui Taylor, Henri Labuschange and John Wright18 Men’s: Luke Heckendorf, John Dustow and Chris Schwerdt 20 Mixed: Rob Bowen, George Haswell and Anthony Smith20 Women’s: Tony Calabria, Alisha Ruaiti and Amanada Sheeky20 Men’s: Luke McKenzie, Cameron MacDonald and Richie Heap last_img read more

Reliable Water Supply for 200,000 Residents in Corporate Area

first_imgThe quality and reliability of water supply to over 200,000 residents in the Corporate Area should be significantly improved, as the Mona and Hope water treatment plants have been rehabilitated at a cost of $1.6 billion. The two facilities have a combined output of more than 40 per cent of the National Water Commission’s (NWC) water production capacity in Kingston and St. Andrew. Speaking at the official commissioning ceremony at the Mona Reservoir complex on June 27, Minister of Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, Hon. Robert Pickersgill, noted that the newly rehabilitated plants will provide savings for the NWC in terms of operating efficiencies and will also benefit customers in terms of service quality. He pointed out thatin a world that is increasingly being impacted by climate change, it is important that the island’s infrastructure be built and maintained to withstand increasing and unpredictable demands. “In other words, water supply systems have to be able to reasonably cope with drought one moment, flooding and turbidity the next and the attendant howling winds and pelting rains of a hurricane the next,” the Minister said. Mr. Pickersgill further noted that the rehabilitation project represents recognition by the NWC of the importance of building a culture of maintenance, so that the country’s existing infrastructure can serve better, longer and be far more efficient. “This is very important if we, as a country, are to get the very best out of our existing infrastructure and to contain the costs that would otherwise be involved if we were to be constantly constructing new facilities,” he said. The Mona Water treatment plant is the second largest such facility in Jamaica and is connected to the country’s largest raw water storage reservoir. The rehabilitation effort has restored the facility to its original designed capacity of 16 million gallons per day, up from the previous average daily production of 13.5 million gallons per day. The work involved the repair of the rapid gravity filters, and the replacement of filter media; installation of automation and regulation controls and equipment, meters and valves; rehabilitation of chemical dosing equipment, including new chlorination facilities; repairs to existing buildings, walkways and other structures; replacement of backwash pumps; upgrading of the storm water drainage system protecting the plant during flood rains, storms and hurricanes, and rehabilitation of the raw water pumping station located at Mona, which serves the Hope filter plant. In the meantime, the Hope Water Treatment Plant was rehabilitated to restore it to its earlier design capacity of 6.5 million gallons per day. Mr. Pickersgill outlined that the works included the rehabilitation of intake structure on the Hope River; rehabilitation of more than two miles of raw water channel, aqueduct, gravel and silt traps; replacement of chemical dosing equipment; repairs to buildings and other structures; repairs and modifications to the settlement tank; and repairs and improvements to slow sand filters, including re-sanding. The Minister pointed out that the project was completed within budget and on time.Contact: Andrea Brahamlast_img read more

Halle Berry To Host Revlon RunWalk For Women In Los Angeles

first_imgOn Saturday, May 10, 2014, the 21st Annual EIF Revlon Run/Walk For Women will take place in Los Angeles.Created by the Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF), Revlon, and Lilly Tartikoff, the EIF Revlon Run/Walk for Women has become one of the largest single-day fundraisers for women’s cancers in the United States. More than 25,000 participants are expected to join and to help raise critical funds to support women’s cancer research, counseling and outreach programs.The event will be hosted by Revlon Global Brand Ambassador Halle Berry, Golden Globe and double Emmy-winning actor Bruce Willis, and Emmy Award-winning actress Christina Applegate with special guest Entertainment Tonight’s Brooke Anderson.There will be special performances by Grammy Award-winning artist Brandy, who will sing the National Anthem during the opening ceremony, and British crooner and recording artist Matt Goss will perform for participants after crossing the finish line. Additional guests to be announced soon.Launched in 1994 through the combined efforts of Lilly Tartikoff, Ronald O. Perelman (Chairman of Revlon, Inc.) and the Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF), the EIF REVLON Run/Walk for Women has distributed more than $70 million to date for cancer research, counseling and outreach programs. The events have raised much needed funds that have helped to deliver a novel, non-toxic treatment for breast cancer called Herceptin with another promising non-toxic treatment on the way.Find out more about the event here.last_img read more

Residents urged to be cautious with rising fire danger rating

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Though the Peace Region was exempt from the province’s campfire ban, the Prince George Fire Centre is still issuing residents to use caution when having a fire.With the fire danger rating climbing between moderate and high in the Peace Region, any unattended fires could lead to something much worse.Fire Information Officer Amanda Reynolds explained that with rising temperature there is potential for lightning hold over fires. “There is always the potential for lightning hold over fires but were not anticipating lightning in the next couple of days,” said Reynolds.Reynolds added that lightning hold overs occur when an area experiences hot temperatures and gets struck by lightning, causing a blaze.Reynolds went on to say that there are no new fires in the Fort St. John area and if residents are careful there won’t be for an extended amount of time.Current Fire Danger Rating. Photo by the Government of British Columbia.last_img read more

Alberta to ease oil production cut again cites lower storage levels

first_imgShe says that is why the province plans to move more oil by rail as Alberta fights for the long-term solution of building pipelines to new markets. EDMONTON, A.B. – Premier Rachel Notley says Alberta will again ease mandatory oil production cuts due to lower storage levels.The province says it will allow increased production by 25,000 barrels per day in April.This will be the second increase since December when the government ordered production of raw crude oil and bitumen to be cut by 325,000 barrels per day to deal with low prices. The first increase was on Jan. 30 when Notley announced the province would allow increased production by 75,000 barrels per day.The government says oil storage levels are trending downward and the price difference between Alberta heavy oil and West Texas Intermediate remains narrow.The province also says warmer weather in spring could mean less diluent will be needed in pipelines, which helps oil flow easier.“As we fight to get full value for the resources owned by all Albertans, we know that our plan is working as we continue to reduce the amount of oil we have in storage,” Notley said Thursday in a release.“The decision to temporarily limit production was applied fairly and equitably, and our plan is working to stop allowing our resource to be sold for pennies on the dollar.”Notley says the short-term production limit is not ideal or sustainable.last_img read more

Colonel dies in Ggn road accident

first_imgGurugram: Colonel Preet Singh who was the serving colonel in the Indian Army lost his life in Gurugram on Monday due to a road accident. Colonel Preet Singh was deputed in Bathinda and was a part of seven engineer regiment.According to the law enforcement, the Army officer who had been awarded sena medal was travelling in the Army vehicle Tata Storme when the Maruti Swift hit his vehicle from the rear side that caused in the massive crash. On Thursday Colonel Singh was cremated with full military honours. The Army officer used to reside with his family in Sector-22 Palam Vihar. His father Raghuveer Singh is a retired judge while his wife Swati Singh is a professor at Delhi University. He had two children a son and a daughter. His son Samayan was eight years of age while his daughter Diksha was just a year old. On average, there are nine accidents that occur daily in Millennium City. In 2014, there were 1180 cases of accidents leading to 430 deaths. In 2015 the cases slightly reduced to 1140 but the death toll was higher at 435 while in 2016 there were 1201 incidents of accidents leading to 420 deaths. In 2018, there were 460 people who had lost their lives on the roads of Gurugram. Officials also indicate that the visibility further decreased during driving heavy vehicles. Other factors resulting in the deadly mishap are fatigue, overspeeding, drunken driving and overloading. To prevent fatalities caused due to mishaps, the Haryana government introduced Haryana vision Zero. The campaign has resulted in reducing the number of accidents in major cities of Haryana including Gurugram.last_img read more

Where Have All The Crafty Pitchers Gone

After Moyer’s retirement, the reigning kings of slow-pitch became Jered Weaver of the Angels and Mark Buehrle of the White Sox and Blue Jays. Buehrle especially belongs squarely among the crafty lefty lineage, alongside Moyer and Glavine; however, he retired after the 2015 season. Over the past two years, in particular, we’ve seen a distinct lack of outlier starters at the bottom of the velocity rankings, the place where the craftiest of pitchers once lurked.To call a pitcher “crafty” is a kind of backhanded compliment. After all, if a guy has overwhelming velocity or electric stuff, we would just talk about that as an explanation for him getting hitters out. (Strikeouts may be fascist, but they are also impressive.) However, Moyer, Buehrle, Hudson and — especially — Maddux and Glavine worked the formula out to perfection. In fact, the 1990s were a heyday of sorts for finesse pitchers, with perfect games from Kenny Rogers and David Wells to go with regular All-Star appearances from the likes of Andy Ashby, Brad Radke and Charles Nagy. None were big strikeout artists, but all were very good pitchers nonetheless thanks to a combination of sharp control, smart situational pitching and keeping the ball in the ballpark.Yet as baseball’s overall velocity bar has raised and preventing home runs has become more difficult, there’s evidence the control-and-command approach has progressively lost its effectiveness. While breaking pitches such as sliders and curves are moving more sharply than ever, it’s not the crafty junkballers of yore who are benefiting most from it.Bill James once broke pitchers into equally sized “power,” “finesse” and “neutral” groups based on their rates of strikeouts plus walks per inning (theorizing that high-velocity pitchers get lots of strikeouts and walks — think Nolan Ryan — while our crafty group doesn’t record much of either). If we do that for qualified starters each season since 1950, we can see the balance of leaguewide pitching wins above replacement1Averaging together the values from FanGraphs and Baseball-Reference.com. has tilted strongly in favor of power pitchers since the early 1970s: Pitching has always been about throwing a baseball really hard — there’s a reason so much of the game’s mythology grew around how quickly hurlers like Walter “Big Train” Johnson and Bob Feller could get the ball from the mound to home plate. But for those who lack overwhelming stuff, there’s another core aspect to pitching: the art of throwing strikes and tricking batters into getting themselves out. Velocity makes a pitcher’s life easier, of course, but plenty of greats from history have thrived on guile instead of a dominating fastball.The craft of finesse pitching, however, might be a dying one in today’s game. A few, such as Arizona’s Zack Greinke and the Cubs’ Kyle Hendricks, have managed to remain effective with a slow fastball and pinpoint control. But the number of star pitchers following that formula has dwindled in recent seasons, in conjunction with the ever-increasing velocity of the average pitch across Major League Baseball. Just a decade ago, we saw Jamie Moyer gutting out complete-game shutouts with an 81-mile-per-hour fastball at age 47 (!) — but are the Moyers of 2019 now getting squeezed out of the sport?Moyer, the southpaw formerly of the Phillies and Mariners (among other teams), was plainly a special pitcher no matter how you measure him. He won only 34 games by his 30th birthday yet still managed to finish with 269 total victories before retiring in 2012 at the age of 49. But Moyer also exemplified a very particular kind of hurler: the prototypical “crafty lefty” who gets by on smarts and makes the best of less-than-stellar velocity readings. In 2002, the earliest year of pitch-speed data at FanGraphs, Moyer — then a youthful 39 — averaged just 82.8 miles per hour on his fastball. (He and Tim Hudson were the only non-knuckleballers with an average fastball under 83.) It was a radar reading that only went down with the passage of time.Back then, though, 11 percent of qualified starters clocked in under 85 mph on average, and 70 percent threw under 90 mph. Moyer even had Hall of Fame company at the bottom of the velocity list, including the likes of Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine. But things changed by the mid-to-late 2000s, when Moyer was perennially the only qualified starter anywhere near the low 80s. In 2010, roughly 1 percent of qualified starters averaged under 85 mph, and only 29 percent were even averaging under 90 mph. Today, nobody averages below 85 mph — Hendricks is baseball’s softest-tossing qualified starter at 86.7 mph — while 16 percent of starters are above 95 mph on their average fastball: Aside from briefly closing the gap a few times over that span — specifically in the mid-1980s and the late 1990s, aka the Moyer and Maddux eras — the finesse pitchers have consistently lost ground value-wise to the hard throwers. The 2017 and 2018 seasons were the first two since 1950 in which the net gap in WAR share between power- and finesse-type starters was at least 18 percentage points in consecutive years. Of the 20 most valuable starters of 2018 by WAR, only one (Miles Mikolas of the Cardinals) was classified as a finesse pitcher; the other 19 were all either power (12) or neutral (7) pitcher types.What accounts for the trend? For one thing, balls in play are at an all-time low, setting a new MLB record for the fewest per game in each of the past five seasons. (We’re down to just 24 balls in play per contest in 2019 so far.) Although most pitchers have little to no control over hits allowed on balls in play during a given season, there are legitimate differences in skill that emerge over entire careers. And part of the crafty-pitcher archetype involves inducing a disproportionate amount of weak contact that fielders can more readily turn into outs.“I didn’t really have swing-and-miss stuff,” Maddux told Dan Patrick in an interview this year. “I wasn’t really worried about giving up singles, but I did what I could to keep the ball in front of the outfielders, not walk anybody and make them get three singles to score.”When there are fewer balls put in play to be had, that formula has less of an effect.There’s also the matter of teams turning to increasingly younger pitchers in recent seasons. Since just about every indicator of power pitching — from pure velocity to strikeouts — is strongly correlated with possessing a younger arm, it makes sense that as young pitchers account for a larger share of the value across MLB, so too will a larger share of WAR be associated specifically with power pitchers (and a smaller share associated with finesse pitchers). Which direction does the causation run? It isn’t totally clear, but it doesn’t especially matter. Whether teams are prizing youth or velocity, it’s squeezing out pitchers who lack either (or both) attributes.“If you look at pitching these days, everything is max effort,” Moyer told the Orange County Register in January. “Look at the younger generations — high school, college, minor leagues, everybody’s trying to light up a radar gun, throw 100 mph. Our bodies aren’t made to perform in this game as a pitcher at max effort.”Although Bartolo Colon, who pitched last season at age 45 as another exemplar of craft triumphing over stuff, the game is generally trending against pitchers like him and Moyer, in many ways.With all of this, it’s fair to wonder whether it would even be possible to dominate with an arsenal resembling, say, Maddux’s, in the modern game. The two-seamer, Maddux’s bewildering weapon of choice, has fallen quickly out of favor in the last decade or so, and a peak-era fastball that barely scraped 90 would rank among the slowest in the league today. Maddux’s specialty, changing speeds, can still be as disruptive as any tactic (just ask Cincinnati ace Luis Castillo). But it’s telling that Maddux himself recognizes what worked in his era might not be as effective now.“I was taught to throw strikes and get hitters out in the strike zone,” Maddux told Patrick. “And now, pitching has kind of turned the other way, where they try to get hitters out outside of the strike zone. I don’t know if I would have adapted to that or not. I’d like to think I could, but who knows what would have happened?”Perhaps the craft of pitching is making something of a comeback this season, with more finesse-oriented pitchers such as Greinke, Hyun-Jin Ryu of the Dodgers and Masahiro Tanaka of the Yankees off to great starts already. Certainly, there always will be a place for pitchers who can transcend the radar gun with intelligence and skill. But just the same, the obsessive quest for velocity in today’s game will probably continue to squeeze out the soft-tossing finesse archetype of yesteryear. Sadly, that means it will be harder than ever for crafty, Moyer-esque pitchers to carve out a place in baseball.Check out our latest MLB predictions. read more

Ed Beathea excited to be coaching Ohio State mens track and field

Ed Beathea became the interim head coach of Ohio State’s men’s track and field in April, following an abrupt end to Robert Gary’s coaching tenure.Beathea’s interim tag was removed when he was officially named the program’s head coach Thursday.Beathea, who joined OSU as associate head coach in 2006, will receive a five-year contract as the team’s new head man. He will also lead the OSU men’s cross-country program.His annual salary will be $95,000, according to an OSU spokesman.Beathea told The Lantern that it is “certainly a big relief” to continue having the opportunity to lead the Buckeyes.“It’s very exciting for me, it’s very exciting for my family,” Beathea said. “The guys on the team are all very excited, they were very supportive and certainly supported me throughout the process.”Prior to joining the OSU coaching staff, Beathea coached sprinters and hurdlers at Indiana University for 10 years, including four seasons as associate head coach. An alumnus of Ball State University, he was also an assistant coach for two seasons at Northern Arizona University prior to his decade at Indiana.OSU fired Gary April 6, according to public records obtained by The Columbus Dispatch. OSU athletic spokesman Dan Wallenberg told the Dispatch that the decision to terminate Gary was made following the university’s discovery of “financial reporting irregularities.”On April 18, Gary was named the head coach of Furman University’s men’s and women’s track and field/cross country program. Furman also hired is wife, Rita, as his assistant coach.Beathea took over head coaching responsibilities for the remainder of the 2012 season following Gary’s firing. Beathea, who coached the Buckeyes to a fourth-place finish at the Big Ten Outdoor Championships, said he was pleased with the team’s performance during his time as interim head coach.“I thought the team performed really well,” Beathea said. “Considering the situation … me having to come in midway through the season, I thought the team was very focused, I thought they were very competitive.”While Beathea was satisfied with his team’s result this spring, he has higher expectations going forward.“It was a tough conference meet outdoor this year,” Beathea said. “I think that our goal is always to be in the top three. I think that our goal in the Big Ten in the next two or three years is to win the conference.”Beathea said he believes the team’s incoming recruiting class is very strong, but that he and his coaching staff will place a greater emphasis upon recruiting.“I think that certainly we will try to recruit more aggressively,” Beathea said. “We’ll certainly have a plan in place for that. Our goal for the national standpoint is to be a top-five or a top-ten team, and the only way that we’re going to be able to do that is to continue to add recruiting classes like the one we had this year.”The team’s incoming recruiting class includes three Gatorade State Track and Field Athletes of the Year. Ohio’s Donovan Robertson, a two-time winner of the award, also won two consecutive Division I state outdoor championships in 110-meter hurdles and 300-meter hurdles, and set the indoor national high school record in 60-meter hurdles in March. Rhode Island’s Joe Velez won the 2012 outdoor national championship in hammer throw, while Pennsylvania’s Billy Stanley had the nation’s second-farthest javelin throw among high school athletes in 2012.Beathea said he is still evaluating his current coaching staff, and whether any changes will be made is “still to be determined.”Beathea said that while his coaching style is different from Gary’s, he does not anticipate significant changes to be made as a result of the coaching change.“I think there’s certainly differences in how Coach Gary led the team and how I led the team, how I lead the team,” Beathea said. “But there’s certainly some similarities … I’m very focused on having a strong culture with a team, having the guys understand what the expectations are, have them understand what’s going on around them with other event areas and other guys on the team.Beathea said he planned on changing things that needed to be changed, but that he wouldn’t need to reinvent the wheel.“I think that we always are open for new ideas.” read more