Asia by Goway launches Romance Thailand campaign

first_img Travelweek Group << Previous PostNext Post >> Asia by Goway launches Romance Thailand campaign Posted by TORONTO — Asia by Goway has launched its Romance Thailand Campaign with bonus upgrade offers.“What the world needs now, is ‘love, sweet love’! You would think it was February with all the love that Goway is showering around,” says the company.Goway has chosen four of its most popular programs for the campaign, highlighting Bangkok, Phuket, Koh Samui and Chiang Mai.Goway has secured bonus upgrades for these destinations, starting with room upgrades from plunge pool suites to pool villas, and deluxe river view rooms.Goway says its partners in Thailand have also offered some great value for these superior room types so that clients can get the full comfort of a romantic stay.Each resort and hotel – eight in total – is also offering value-adds to enhance each couple’s stay. These include 60- and 90-minute massages, spa treatments, dinner options (including one that comes with butler service), cooking classes with an executive chef and plus food and beverage credits.More news:  Save the dates! Goway’s Africa Roadshow is backA variety of packages are available, either pairing Bangkok with one of Thailand’s famous beach destinations, or delivering the full Thailand experience with an additional stay in Chiang Mai. Prices start at $2,189 out of Vancouver for City and Beach with Phuket.To be eligible for this offer, clients must book by Sept. 30.center_img Tags: Asia Pacific, Romance & Weddings, Thailand Tuesday, August 29, 2017 Sharelast_img read more

With so many players to compete with and precious

first_imgWith so many players to compete with and precious reps with which to impress the coaches, it would make sense if Momah lived and died with each chance — after all, his career very well might.Yet, he does not approach things that way.“You can’t put pressure on it or else you’re going to stress your life away,” he said. “Honestly, it’s just take one day, one step at a time. Play to the best of your abilities and turn that stuff off and play ball. Can’t think about anything else.”His roster spot anything but secure, Momah has stood out since OTAs and minicamp. However, as Cardinals head coach Bruce Arians likes to say, those practices are more like soccer, with no pads and very little contact.Training camp is different, and where jobs are won or lost.“He’s stuck his face in there pretty good, had a couple of nice blocks [Tuesday],” Arians said. “That was the thing we all wanted to see because he was one hell of a player in FIFA.  He was like the all-star FIFA player. Now he’s a pretty good football player.”While things are going well now, Momah knows he has plenty to work on to stick in the NFL. He says speed is his greatest attribute — and that has been on display at times during camp — but added he must get better at blocking, as it’s a key part of his new position. Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling “I’ve got to get used to the techniques and learning that stuff,” he said. “I’m still learning every day, of course, so I would say that’s the thing I can improve on right now.”If he can get better quickly, Momah’s combination of size and speed could very easily present a mismatch for opposing defenses. Already in camp, there have been instances of Cardinals quarterbacks being able to throw over the top of trailing linebackers to the bigger Momah, which is the mismatch he knows is there for him. Now, it’s about taking advantage of those opportunities.“I had a couple [Wednesday] that I didn’t get to take full advantage of, I was pissed during the practice,” he said. “But we’ll go back, watch the film and learn from it, and make sure it doesn’t happen again. That’s all you can do.”Though Momah may be a relative unknown, there are some out there who see big things in his future. CBS Sports’ Pete Prisco referred to him in a tweetas a “sleeper TE,” and told Doug and Wolf on Arizona Sports 98.7 FM Wednesday morning that some with the Cardinals think he could emerge as a “40-catch guy.”Momah said he can’t think of predictions like that. If all goes according to plan, he said he’d haul in more than 40 catches. Tight end Ifeanyi Momah reels in the football during Arizona Cardinals training camp Tuesday, Aug. 4. (Photo by Adam Green/Arizona Sports) GLENDALE, Ariz. — After Jermaine Gresham, the Arizona Cardinals’ tight end room is filled with youth, potential and intrigue.Perhaps no player embodies more of that than Ifeanyi Momah, who came to the Cardinals on a one-year deal following an impressive showing at the NFL Veterans Combine in March.At 6-foot-7 and 255-pounds, he has incredible size, and as a former wide receiver at Boston College, you know he has good hands. Top Stories Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires “If all goes according to plan, then I’ll have the most catches on this team, that’s the plan I set for myself, the goal I set for myself,” he said. “Realistically, I’m just trying to get out there and play every day, every down best that I can, one practice at a time, so I can set myself up for the regular season.”– / 38center_img Comments   Share   Your browser does not support the audio element. LISTEN: Ifeanyi Momah, Cardinals Tight End The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo What he doesn’t have is much of a track record.Momah caught just 39 passes for 629 yards and six touchdowns as a wide receiver in college. His senior season was cut short due to a torn ACL after he had amassed 171 yards on eight catches in a loss to Northwestern. As a pro, Momah bounced around from the Philadelphia Eagles to the Cleveland Browns, and from the Browns to the Detroit Lions.Now, he’s trying to earn a spot with the Cardinals.“Every day is different, a lot of ups and downs, I’d say,” Momah said Wednesday when asked how things are going for him. “I’d say today was more on the downside. I got a lot of reps and busted my butt, but some plays didn’t come up like I wanted to, but that’s practice. Got to come back out here the next day, try to get better and get ready for these games, that’s what really matters.“Get ready for the games. Play well in the games.”The games may be where Momah’s combination of size and speed really shows itself. Until then all the 25-year-old can do is continue to learn his new position while trying to impress a coaching staff that has shown a willingness to play younger players as long as they can produce.And early in camp, Momah — along with a few of the team’s other young tight ends — has gotten a great opportunity, as both Gresham and second-year pro Troy Niklas have been sidelined with injuries. That’s left more reps for the rest of the group, which also includes Darren Fells, Gerald Christian, Ted Bolser and Gannon Sinclair. Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

May 3 2000 A concrete pour at Arcosanti is always

first_imgMay 3, 2000A concrete pour at Arcosanti is always an exciting time for workers in construction.This week another group of Japanese students work on the East Crescent Complex Photo by Scott Riley.last_img

Kochfunded Nonprofit Fights for Fossil Fuels as Good for the Poor

first_imgShare31TweetShare1Email32 Sharesfossil-fueled power plant / glasseyes viewJanuary 5, 2017; New York TimesIn the face of the imminent threat from global warming, decreasing our dependence on carbon-based fuels is critical. This need poses a direct threat to the wealth and power of those who have invested heavily in drilling, mining, and related businesses. Typically, the debate has centered on whether global warming is real and to what degree human actions have influenced or driven it. Perhaps in recognition that this point is a lost cause, oil interests are changing their message and seeking new allies in unexpected places.A new nonprofit business organization, Fueling U.S. Forward, is leading an effort to position fossil fuels as the fuel of the people, essential to every American’s economic security:Access to reliable energy is the common thread that binds millions of Americans together as we set out to build, create, and care for people living in the greatest nation in the world. When we talk about powering our future, we can’t afford to leave anything on the table…domestic oil and natural gas is the key to ensuring Americans continue to grow, innovate, and thrive into tomorrow.[…]Energy shapes everything we do, every moment of our life—so much so that we often take it for granted. No longer. The story of energy is one worth telling, and one best told by the people who have the most at stake…we’re going to take the conversation out of Washington, D.C. and into local communities. We’ll talk to people of diverse backgrounds—industry employees, small business owners, community leaders, and low-income families—and share their stories.According to a recent report in the New York Times, Fueling U.S. Forward is “funded by Koch Industries, the oil and petrochemicals conglomerate led by the ultraconservative billionaire brothers David H. and Charles G. Koch.” Their strategy is to change the debate about global warming from one about science to one about self-interest and economic security. A new argument gives them the opportunity to reach out to “new allies in their quest for a fossil fuel resurgence: minorities.”Funds provided by Fueling U.S. Forward supported a meeting last June of the National Policy Alliance (NPA), which comprised major organizations representing black public officials from federal, state, and local levels of government. The purpose of the meeting was to develop policy recommendations that could be “a living document, to be updated and more importantly, acted upon, as we select our next president, congressmen, and local officials.”This new tack on building support for fossil fuels seems to have gotten some traction. The platform that emerged from the meeting strongly connected energy to economic security and ignored the consequences of global warming: “Access to affordable, reliable energy is crucial to economic progress. Low income families, many in the Black community, spend as much money on energy as they do on food. […] Policies that subsidize electric vehicles and solar panels for the wealthy raise energy prices and harm the black community.” Linda Haithcox Taylor, executive director of the National Policy Alliance, said that the organization was just “standing up for poor, underserved communities.”Eddie Bautista, executive director of the NYC Environmental Justice Alliance, a nonprofit that works with low-income and minority neighborhoods on environmental issues, doesn’t agree. He told the Times that the campaign is “an exploitative, sad and borderline racist strategy.” He pointed to the falling costs associated with renewable energy, which he said made shifting away from reliance on fossil fuels a winning proposition for everyone.This is an approach that mirrors the successful strategy employed by the Trump campaign in its appeal to white working class voters. It plays on economic struggles, fears, and worries. It looks to blame a distant “elite.” If global warming is indeed as real as our scientists tell us it is, this strategy carries great risk to the very people it’s trying to bring on board. Fossil fuels may be cheaper today, helping those with limited resources stretch their budgets, but the threats posed by a warming earth will affect these very communities first and hardest.—Martin LevineShare31TweetShare1Email32 Shareslast_img read more

Russian service provider ERTelecom had 1747 mill

first_imgRussian service provider ER-Telecom had 1.747 million TV subscribers at the end of last year, up 43% compared with 2010.Broadband internet customers numbered 1.899 million, up 39%, while fixed-line phone subscribers numbered 265,000, up 98%. ER-Telecom made a number of significant acquisitions in the course of the year.Revenue from TV services amounted to RUB2.868 billion (€72 million), while broadband revenues amounted to RUB6.166 billion.Overall revenues were RUB9.688 billion, up 43%. The company has set a target of winning a 20% share of the country’s internet and pay TV business by 2014. ER-Telecom envisages further investments to the amount of US$500 million (€381 million) to help it reach this target.ER-Telecom’s customers base at the end of the year was 3.9 million.last_img read more

Amazonas 5 Hispasats Amazonas 5 satellite has arr

first_imgAmazonas 5Hispasat’s Amazonas 5 satellite has arrived at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan ahead of it’s planned launch next month.The satellite arrived aboard an Antonov cargo jet and is due to launch on an ILS Proton Breeze M launch vehicle in September.Amazonas 5 will be located at 61°West and will provide video, internet and other services to Latin America. The satellite is designed to be in service for 15 years or more.Hispasat claims to be the leading distributor and broadcaster of Spanish and Portuguese content, with its satellite fleet is used by important direct-to-home television and HDTV digital platforms.Hispasat also provides satellite broadband services and other added value solutions to governments, corporations and telecommunication operators in America, Europe and North Africa.last_img read more

The Impact of High and Growing Government Debt on

first_img“The Impact of High and Growing Government Debt on Economic Growth – An Empirical Investigation for the Euro Area,” by Cristina Checherita and Philipp Rother, European Central Bank, Working Paper Series 1237, August 2010.These papers reflect serious research by world-class economists from the US, Europe and Sweden – and they all confirm the detrimental consequences of extreme governmental indebtedness.Misery on the Rise AgainIn the past year, Okun’s impartial arbiter averaged 10.5%, the highest on record for the third year of an officially recognized economic recovery and almost double the average of the 1950s. The latest readings have occurred despite US gross public debt in excess of 103% of GDP and with the Federal Reserve’s unprecedentedly large balance sheet that approaches nearly $3 trillion.Other measures of well-being confirm the Misery Index. The Poverty Index in 2011 appears to have reached 15.7%, the highest reading in five decades. Not surprisingly, two unenviable records have been set: 46 million, or 14.6% of the population, are now in the food stamp program, up from 7.9% in 1970 and a record-high 41% pay zero national income tax.In the eleven quarters of this expansion, the growth of real per-capita GDP was the lowest for all of the comparable post-WWII business cycle expansions. Real per-capita disposable personal income has risen by a scant 0.1% annual rate, remarkably weak when compared with the 2.9% post-war average. It is often said that economic conditions would have been much worse if the government had not run massive budget deficits and the Fed had not implemented extraordinary policies. This whole premise is wrong.In all likelihood the governmental measures made conditions worse, and the poor results reflect the counterproductive nature of fiscal and monetary policies. None of these numerous actions produced anything more than transitory improvement in economic conditions, followed by a quick retreat to a faltering pattern while leaving the economy saddled with even greater indebtedness. The diminutive gain in this expansion is clearly consistent with the view that government actions have hurt, rather than helped, economic performance. Sadly, many of those who the government programs were supposedly designed to help the most have suffered the worst.The Way OutThe original theoretical argument in favor of deficit spending originated in J.M. Keynes’ The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money (1936). A search of Keynes’ work reveals no recognition of the “bang point,” or the condition where a government engages in deficit spending for such a prolonged period of time that a massive buildup of debt leads to denial of additional credit to the government because of fear that the existing debt will not be repaid. Nor did Keynes address the situation where a large number of countries are all simultaneously getting deeper and deeper in debt and there are gradations of debt among these countries – serious shortfalls in the basic Keynesian theory.Keynes, as opposed to some of his interpreters and predecessors, may have implicitly recognized that a bang point could occur, because he did not recommend constant budget deficits. Instead, he advocated cyclical deficits, counterbalanced by cyclical budget surpluses. Under such a system, government debt in bad times would be retired in good times. However, Keynes’ original proposition was bastardized in support of perpetual deficits, something Keynes himself never advocated.Milton Friedman, whom many consider to have been the polar opposite of Keynes, also never addressed the concept of a bang point, but he may also have understood implicitly that such a situation could occur. The reason is that Friedman advocated balanced budgets, which if followed or required constitutionally as Friedman argued, would prevent a buildup of debt. This view was largely rejected as being inhumane since in a recession, government policy would not be responsive to unemployment and other miseries of such a condition. What should have been discussed is whether some short-term misery is a better option than putting the entire country and economic system in jeopardy, as numerous examples in Europe currently illustrate.The most sensible recognition of budget policy came not from Keynes nor Friedman, but from David Hume, one of the greatest minds of mankind, whom Adam Smith called the greatest intellect that he ever met. In his 1752 paper “Of Public Finance,” Hume advocated running budget surpluses in good times so that they could be used in time of war or other emergencies. Such a recommendation would, of course, prevent policies that would send countries barreling toward the bang point. Countries would have to live inside their means most of the time, but in emergency situations would have the resources to respond.In the context of today’s world, this approach would be viewed as unacceptable because it would limit the ability of politicians to continue their excessive spending, thereby saddling future generations with obligations and promises that cannot be honored. But isn’t Hume’s recommendation exactly what we taught our children in preparing them to manage their own personal finances?Lacy Hunt is the executive vice-president of Hoisington Investment Management, a firm with over $5.8 billion under management, and one of the nation’s top-performing bond managers. Lacy’s work has been published in Barron’s, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, the Journal of Finance, the Financial Analysts Journal and the Journal of Portfolio Management. Previously he was the chief economist for the HSBC Group, one of the world’s largest banks, and the senior economist for the Dallas Fed.At the Casey Research/Sprott Summit, he will be making a comprehensive presentation on the policy options the government has left to it, the consequences of those options, and how investors can position themselves. He will also be participating in an on-stage exchange of views on the Fed with G. Edward Griffin, the author of the best-selling Creature from Jekyll Island and long-term Fed critic.One of the really great things about these Summits is that most of the faculty, including Lacy, attend the entire event, giving you a rare opportunity to meet them in person and get your specific questions answered.Friday FunnyI have seen a number of iterations of this particular “funny,” but this one goes a couple of steps further in explaining the dynamics, so I wanted to include it here.Suppose that every day, ten men go out for a beer and the bill for all ten comes to $100.If they paid their bill the way we pay our taxes, it would go something like this:The first four men (the poorest) would pay nothing.The fifth would pay $1.00The sixth would pay $3.00The seventh would pay $7.00The eighth would pay $12.00The ninth would pay $18.00The tenth man (the richest) would pay $59.00So that’s what they decided to do. The men drank in the bar every day and seemed quite happy with the arrangement, until one day the owner threw them a curve.“Since you are all such good customers,” he said, “I’m going to reduce the cost of your daily beer by $20.00.”Drinks for the ten men now cost just $80.00.The group still wanted to pay their bill the way we pay our taxes, so the first four men were unaffected. They would still drink for free. But what about the other six men – the paying customers? How could they divide the $20 windfall so that everyone would get their “fair share?”They realized that $20.00 divided by six is $3.33. But if they subtracted that from everybody’s share, then the fifth man and the sixth man would each end up being paid to drink his beer. So, the bar owner suggested that it would be fair to reduce each man’s bill by roughly the same amount, and he proceeded to work out the amounts each should pay.And so:The fifth man, like the first four, now paid nothing (100% savings).The sixth now paid $2 instead of $3 (33% savings).The seventh now paid $5 instead of $7 (28% savings).The eighth now paid $9 instead of 12 (25% savings).The ninth now paid $14 instead of $18 (22% savings).The tenth now paid $49 instead of $59 (16% savings).Each of the six was better off than before! And the first four continued to drink for free. But once outside the restaurant, the men began to compare their savings.“I only got a dollar out of the $20” declared the sixth man. He pointed to the tenth man, “But he got $10!”“Yeah, that’s right,” shouted the seventh man. “Why should he get $10 back when I got only two? The wealthy get all the breaks!”“Wait a minute,” yelled the first four men in unison. “We didn’t I get anything at all. The system exploits the poor!”The nine men surrounded the tenth and beat him up.The next night the tenth man didn’t show up for drinks, so the nine sat down and had beers without him. But when it came time to pay the bill, they discovered something important. They didn’t have enough money between all of them for even half of the bill!And that, boys and girls, journalists and college professors, is how our tax system works. The people who pay the highest taxes get the most benefit from a tax reduction. Tax them too much, attack them for being wealthy, and they just may not show up anymore. In fact, they might start drinking overseas where the atmosphere is somewhat friendlier.For those who understand, no explanation is needed.For those who do not understand, no explanation is possible.Casey Report Editors in the NewsIn the way of weekend reading/watching, following are links to some media coverage senior Casey Report editors Bud Conrad  and Doug Casey received this week.The first is an interview with Bud Conrad by the always competent Jim Puplava of the Financial Sense Newshour. In it, Bud discusses his analysis of how the new abundance of natural gas is a game changer for the US. He lays out how the new technology has provided the US with a huge new source of energy that is growing in production and use. Here’s a link to the interview.Better still, you can get the whole story with the details in charts and graphs showing a new method for predicting the price of natural gas, and Bud’s investment prediction, by signing up for a no-risk trial to The Casey Report.Doug Casey ripping things up at the Agora Financial Conference. My dear business partner of some years is many things, but a shrinking violet is not one of them. Regular correspondent Brett of the Contrary Investing Report is in the audience at the Agora Financial Conference now going on in Vancouver, and filed the following recap of Doug’s remarks. Here’s the link.Weekend ReadsMuch of these fall into the category of yet more examples of central planning and the consequences that inevitably follow. Some are quite eye-opening, starting with…Fire Ice – We have all seen the news about the deadly wildfires now sweeping the western United States. Would you believe that there is a proven technology that could have snuffed those fires out long ago? That could snuff them out right away? Yet the company that possesses the technology – which other states have used very successfully – remains sidelined. Perhaps, as one observer put it, by whichever politically well-connected company now has the contract to fight the fires. Here’s the link to the eye-opening story of Fire Ice.Bloomberg on Cops Going on Strike – You probably heard that Mayor Bloomberg of NYC proposed that the nation’s police go on strike until gun control laws are enacted. If not, here’s the story – and a fact-based response to his contention that police are increasingly at risk from being shot by members of the public. The truth, however, is just the opposite – with police shootings, such as set off the Anaheim riot, on the increase. Here’s the story from the always excellent Reason.com.Also from Reason, a Mind-Numbing Story About the IRS – Imagine a family being asked to pay millions in taxes for a piece of worthless art. Worthless not because it’s not fine art (though not to my taste), but because the government’s own rules make it illegal to sell. Here’s the story.Airports and Border Crossings in Canada Wired with Listening Equipment – from Our Friends at the  International Man. One of the participants in the forum at InternationalMan.com tipped us off to this story, that the Canadians are wiring their airports and border crossings so that they can listen in and record your conversations as you wait to go through. What has happened to the world? Oh, that’s right, I remember – the central planners, in this case those charged with protecting our “security,” have been at it again. Next time you are in a Canadian airport, any airport, remember, mum’s the word.And Finally…Ending on a positive note, the following just came across the wires. Though the story comes from Cuba, it points to a better, freer future for us all.That’s because while a centrally planned, command economy can last a long time, it can’t last forever. And when the house of (poorly arranged) cards comes crashing down, the free market will reemerge.Here’s the headline of the story, and a link to read it.Cuba to end Soviet-style economy and will implement market-friendly policiesHere’s the linkAnd with that, I will sign off for the week by thanking you for reading and for being a Casey Research subscriber.Remember, the early-bird pricing for our upcoming Summit ends July 31 – don’t miss it.See you there!David GallandManaging DirectorCasey Research “Government Size and Growth:  A Survey and Interpretation of the Evidence,” by Andreas Bergh and Magnus Henrekson, IFN Working Paper No. 858, April 2011; Dear Reader,Before I begin today’s musings, I would like to give a musical nod to Bush, a band that seems to me to be largely overlooked. If you are unfamiliar with them (and don’t mind some fairly hard rock), here are a few selections to keep you company this fine day… Glycerin… Everything’s Zen (live)… Comedown.And so, with feet and fingers tapping madly, we move on…What (Almost) Everyone Fails to Understand About Our EconomyI want to start today’s missive with a couple of unusual charts. Unusual because they contain no reference points. Here’s the first.And here’s the second.We’ll return to those charts momentarily. First, however, a confession.As much as I read, and despite interacting with very smart people on a daily basis, until just recently I have missed something about our economy that, on reflection, should have been as obvious as the computer screen I spend far too many hours staring at.Allow me to emphasize the point in somewhat stronger terms.That I could have overlooked this particular aspect of the US economy and the overarching consequences that follow from it for all these years should, if I were a lawyer, cause me to be disbarred. If I were a doctor, the medical practice board would be entirely within their rights to revoke my license. If I were a politician, my benefactors would be entirely justified in cutting off my bribes donations. If I were a… well, you get the idea.Interestingly, as smack-up-the-side-of-the-head obvious as this feature of the economy is, and has been for years, virtually everyone else has failed to spot it as well.So, what is this mystery?Succinctly, it is that, like Europe (where, during my recent trip there, the spark of awareness was lit), the economy of the United States is, and has been for decades, increasingly under the control of central planners at the expense of the free market.As proof of that contention, we return to the two charts above. Here, again, is the first, but with the contextual reference points in place.(Click on image to enlarge)As you can see, the chart tracks the purchasing power of the US dollar since 1914, the year that the government, through its stooges at the Fed, took command of monetary policy. Laughably, the stated mission of these central planners was to preserve the value of the dollar. Predictably, exactly the opposite resulted.And here’s the second chart, also with the reference points in place.(Click on image to enlarge)As you can so clearly see, after severing the last connection with the gold standard in 1971, after which point the central planners took command of fiscal policy, we have seen an exponential growth in government debt.(Of course, the numbers on the national debt are grossly understated as it doesn’t account for the tens of trillions of dollars of unfunded and unpayable obligations tied to Social Security, Medicare and so forth.)Now, I could go on and on, finding dozens of examples of the shift from a free market to a command economy, but in the interest of time will stop there.The point, which I hope is now clear to all, is that the economic model that allowed the United States to rise out of abject poverty at its inception to become the most powerful economy the world has ever seen has been tossed aside in favor of a model that has proven time and again to be fundamentally flawed and always doomed to fail.That the central-planning model, here and around the world, has been advanced by a fiat global reserve currency is undeniable. However, as the two charts clearly show, the consequences of having central planners controlling monetary and fiscal policy have created a ticking time bomb set to explode.A few additional comments are warranted.The first has to do with who the central planners actually are. And the best way to understand that is by considering who they are not.Who they are not is successful entrepreneurs. Stating what should also be obvious, were they successful entrepreneurs, they would be otherwise engaged in creating jobs and building wealth for themselves and their co-workers.Instead, the central planners almost always hail from the halls of academia, their stock and trade consisting entirely of a college degree and a façade of really knowing what they talk about. As a friend likes to say, “The biggest problems in this world are not caused by a lack of knowledge, but by people who pretend to know when they don’t.”Over the years I have met and even gotten to know people who have gravitated toward jobs involved with setting government policies. And to a person, they have never held a real job outside of academia, or if they did, they failed at it. Yet they are unhesitant in telling everyone who will listen in tones most professorial how the world should work, and why enlightened government policies – not the free market – are the only answer.These people have taken over our country, and in fact, the world. The current mess we are in should not be a surprise to anyone. All anyone has to do is look at the history of the Soviet Union, or communist China, pre-economic liberalization, to see how the story of command economies ends. How it always ends.So, where do things go from here?Earlier today I dropped an email to our editors, which I will quote from here as it deals with what I see as the fate of the global economy over the next six months or so.“It’s all about the debt.“The sovereigns owe a lot of money that they can’t repay. As they try to roll over their existing debts and have to borrow more, the lenders – if any can be found – will want higher and eventually unaffordable interest rates. When the lenders dry up, the only solution will be for the central bankers to monetize, but the world will be watching closely, so this will likely trigger a death spiral in the fiat currencies.“There are intractable problems on a fundamental, systemic basis that cannot be resolved in an orderly fashion. The day is coming when the lending locks up again, after which point everything starts to fall apart.“So, no, I don’t think it’s a muddle by outcome, but a systemic crash… hopefully big enough to cause a rethink about the entire current setup with funny money and central economic planning.“But that would take a very big crash.”Now, I know that a lot of dear subscribers, having accepted our arguments for including tangible assets as a core portfolio holding for many years now, have struggled during the latest retracement and consolidation period in the precious metals and associated stocks.But if you step back and look at the big picture as it is constantly revealed in the headlines and regular releases of poor economic data, I think the conclusions we came to back before the crisis hit, that the Fed (and all the central bankers) are stuck between a rock and a hard place, remain the correct conclusions.There is no simple or easy way out of this situation as the central planners are forced into a haphazard and highly destructive retreat. And the consequences won’t just be economic or political… the mini-riots in Anaheim this past week are just a straw in the wind.So, how does one cope in a command economy headed, like all its predecessors, into the trash bin of history – in this case, on a global scale?First and foremost, diversify. Everything contains risk, so spreading it around to mitigate the chances of getting hit especially hard from any one investment sector makes a lot of sense.Personally, I use a spread sheet program to analyze my holdings from a number of different angles, including percentage dedicated to natural resources; percentage in non-US-dollar-denominated assets; percentage outside of the United States; percentage with any one financial institution; percentage in dividend earning stocks; percentage liquid vs. illiquid; percentage in common equities; percentage in cash and so forth.The idea is that if any one area becomes overweight or underweight, I look to make adjustments. In addition, I set certain goals – for example, the percentage of our net worth we want outside of the United States – and manage to that number.In short, pay close attention to where your assets are allocated and don’t go overboard in any one sector.Secondly, skew toward things tangible. Over the next few years, we are going to see massive dislocations as the fiat currency system cracks apart, starting with the euro and then, after a final rush into the “safe harbor” of the US dollar, spreading to the dollar itself.As much as possible, own things with a tangible value. Precious metals are fine, but don’t go overboard as that makes you susceptible to a change in government regulations that could literally be invoked overnight. Consider property, and even income-producing property (in low-tax jurisdictions). But, again, don’t go overboard because real estate is always a fixed target, which means the government can tax it or even confiscate it, and you won’t be able to do much about it. Owning currencies of countries with large resources is a proxy for owning something tangible, though an imperfect proxy.Be careful. It will only get more challenging to build net worth going forward. Whether it be higher taxes on capital gains (a certainty at some point) or the cancellation of tax breaks, or more demands on business owners from legislation such as Obamacare, generating – and more to the point, keeping – net worth will not be easy. Therefore, rule number one has to be to avoid risking big chunks of money.Sit tight, and be right. Per my comments above, I remain convinced that our Casey Research base case – of a global economic crisis that will get much worse before it gets better, and that the central planners have few options left to them other than monetary debasement – is correct.For those of you who already have allocations to the tangibles, and to the gold stocks (which are massively undervalued at this point), sit tight and you will come out right. If you are just now rethinking how to reposition your portfolio to get through what’s next, then do yourself a favor and take a low-cost, money-back-guaranteed subscription to our BIG GOLD service and start adding positions on the inevitable pullbacks.These are, of course, only some of the strategies you can use. The most comprehensive analysis of the situation, and how to prepare for what’s next, will be at the upcoming three-day intensive Summit we are co-hosting with Sprott, Inc., Navigating the Politicized Economy, in beautiful Carlsbad, California, September 7 – 9.Speaking of the Summit, one of the smartest people you’ll rub elbows with at the event will again be Dr. Lacy Hunt, the former economist to the Dallas Fed (but a Fed fan no longer) and the nation’s top-performing bond fund manager. Earlier this week, Lacy shot me over the following article that is well worth your attention.Unintended Consequences of Well-Motivated PoliciesBy Dr. Lacy HuntIn the early 1960s, when JFK was in the White House and William McChesney Martin was Fed chairman, Keynesian economics was in full bloom. One of its major tenets was the Phillips Curve, which posits a stable inverse relationship between the rate of inflation and the unemployment rate. Yale professor James Tobin (1918-2002) and others argued that the social outcome could be improved by a more activist monetary and fiscal policy. Specifically, they contended that the unemployment rate could be lowered while only resulting in slightly higher inflation.The argument posited the notion that economic-policy makers had sufficient knowledge to intervene or fine-tune the economy with tools like those of a surgeon. Presidents Johnson, Nixon and Carter (two Democrats and one Republican) followed this policy. At one point, President Nixon made the famous statement that “We are all Keynesians now.” Moreover, as the White House led, the Fed chairmen of the era – Martin, Burns and Miller – generally acquiesced.To judge the effectiveness of this policy, an objective standard is needed. Arthur M. Okun (1928-80), Yale colleague of Tobin, developed such a standard, which he called the Misery Index – the sum of the inflation and unemployment rates.Under the activist, Phillips Curve-based policy, some reduction in unemployment was temporarily achieved. However, inflation accelerated much more than was anticipated, and the net result was higher unemployment and faster inflation, an outcome not at all contemplated by the Phillips Curve. The Misery Index surged from an average of 6.7% in the 1950s, to 7.3% in the 1960s, to 13.6% in the 1970s, with peak rates above 20% in the early 1980s.Many US households suffered. Wages of lower-paying positions failed to keep up with inflation, and when higher unemployment resulted, many of those people lost their jobs. Those on the high end had far more resources that enabled them to protect their investments and earned income, so the income/wealth divide worsened. A half-century later, the United States has never regained the prosperity of the 1950s.Working independently in the late 1960s, economists Milton Friedman and Edmund Phelps, who would both eventually be awarded the Nobel Prize in economics, had determined that while the Phillips Curve was observable over the short run, this was not the case over the long run. While the economics profession debated the Friedman/Phelps research, the US had to learn their findings the hard way.Growing Evidence of the Long-term Depressants from Activist PoliciesIn addition to the compelling evidence that more active monetary and fiscal policy involvement did not produce beneficial results over the short run, three recent academic studies, though they differ in purpose and scope, all reach the conclusion that extremely high levels of governmental indebtedness diminish economic growth. In other words, deficit spending should not be called “stimulus” as is the overwhelming tendency by the media and many economic writers.Whereas government spending may have been linked to the concept of economic stimulus in distant periods, these studies demonstrate that such an assertion is unwarranted, and blatantly wrong in present circumstances. While officials argue that governmental action is required for political reasons and public anxiety, governments would be better off to admit that traditional tools only serve to compound existing problems.These three highly compelling studies are:“Debt Overhangs: Past and Present,” by Carmen M. Reinhart, Vincent R. Reinhart and Kenneth S. Rogoff, National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper 18015, April 2012;last_img read more

In This Issue   Antipodeans see profit taking

first_imgIn This Issue. *  Antipodeans see profit taking. *  Pound sterling is star performer overnight! *  China prints strong data! *  Silver to get boost from India? And Now. Today’s A Pfennig For Your Thoughts. Retail Sales Disappoints! Good Day! .  And a Happy Friday to one and all! This will be short-n-sweet today, I feel like dookie, and really just want to go back to sleep! But, even this out of whack feeling won’t stop me from getting the Pfennig out! Rain, sleet, snow, feeling like dookie, or anything else, will keep the Pfennig from going out!  Just typing that last sentence, makes me feel better, let’s hope that trend continues! The trend that has continued in the currencies is the lack of volume in trades. This has gone on way too long, and really has me concerned. The Currencies trading is usually around a $5 Trillion per day size business.. I doubt we’ve come close to that $5 Trillion in a month of Sundays. And when you have this lack of volume, you get wild swings. The wild swing that happened last night came from the Antipodean currencies of Australia and New Zealand.  These two had just spent the previous night and day in the spotlight, but just like that, the euphoria was thrown to the side of the road, and profit taking set in. Before you could say, “what, the what?” these two had lost a chunk.  and a wild swing from day to day occurred. One thing that you can’t rule out here is Central Bank intervention. Remember, these Central Banks, have mentioned over and over again that the currencies are at historical highs, against the backdrop of weak commodity prices. In other words, they think the currencies should be weaker, and after a day of Huge gains in these two, what better day to intervene and sell the currencies by the Central Banks?  I have no idea if this happened, and we wouldn’t know for a few weeks, I’m just saying. Remember a couple of days ago, when the euro had gotten whacked , I said, that the euro just needed a couple of days to allow the markets forget the pain. Well, that appears to be the scenario for the euro, as yesterday the euro began to creep higher, and overnight it has added to the gains, the moves are small, in that the single unit is still below 1.36, but rising nonetheless!  There’s really been no data to speak of here, so the euro is trading on its own, and doing much better than earlier in the week! The star performer overnight and through this morning’s session is the British pound sterling. I had read yesterday that Bank of England (BOE) Gov. Carney was going to be a key speaker at the annual Mansion House jamboree, and Carney decided to use this venue to tell everyone that the BOE may raise interest rates from a record low earlier than investors expected.  Now, this is where I want to get on my soapbox and yell at the top of my voice to the markets, that we’ve seen this all before! Remember? Carney kept promising a rate hike in Canada, and after a couple of years, where were Canadian rates? That’s right, unchanged. Carney had a bag full of promises then, and I would have to think that this horse hasn’t changed colors.  Of course if he does deliver a rate hike much earlier, then I will admit that he is a horse of a different color! But, I think the pound sterling will suffer much like the Canadian dollar/ loonie did after a run up in price, only to see the selling when the markets grew tired of waiting for Carney’s rate hike. But that doesn’t mean you can’t take advantage of a rising sterling as it’s taking place. It just means you need to be nimble when you begin to see the pieces of sterling’s armor begin to fall to the ground. Well, the World Cup kicked off (pun intended) yesterday with the host country Brazil beating Croatia.  And the tourists and soccer fans are pouring into Brazil, and exchanging their base currencies for Brazilian reals. The real has really responded favorably lately, and its strong move has me worried. I know that some of you weren’t around the last time we saw the real go on a tear ( a few years ago it was the best performing currency with a 34% gain one year!) the Brazilian Gov’t and Central Bank teamed up to bring the real to its knees, and beg forgiveness for being so strong.  This time, the gang of two, as I like to call them, are singing a different tune, and besides real isn’t nearly as strong as it was before.  But in the past year, real has moved from 2.4550 to 2.2315, where it trades today..  (remember, real is a European priced currency, so the lower the price, the more value it returns in dollars)  Just remember, that reals can be very volatile, which is why I always say that it should only be bought in the speculative portion of your investment portfolio.  Good investors know that by doing that, they’ll not worry about the volatile moves. The South African Credit Rating was downgraded by Fitch overnight from stable to negative. YIKES!  Maybe Fitch didn’t get the memo that the strike in S. Africa mining had ended! Needless to say that this downgrade news was not taken kindly by the S. African rand.. The rand has really taken it on the chin for the last year, and hasn’t been able to find a bid anywhere. I think the S. African Central Bank will have to hike rates to get the bleeding to stop here in the rand. But I doubt that will happen any time soon, so batten down the hatches rand holders. China printed some good data overnight. Chinese Industrial Output rose at a 8.8% clip in May from a year earlier, up from the 8.7% clip in April. And Retail Sales for May increased 12.5%!!!!! Now that’s a Retail Sales figure a country can be proud of! (we’ll talk about the U.S. Retail Sales report in a minute) Recall that a week or so ago, I told you that I thought the Chinese Gov’t was going to step up the stimulus for the economy. Well, these reports are either telling us that the Chinese Gov’t did step up the stimulus and it’s already working, or that the economy didn’t need any more stimulus other than the “mini-stimulus” that was already in the works! I prefer to think that it was the latter of the two! In India overnight, the rupee lost some more ground, as it still attempts to remove the knife from its back, but there were a couple of new items that should help the rupee going forward. First, India’s state-run solar company announced plans to auction contracts to build 100 megawatts of solar-thermal capacity. And the second new item was that India imported Gold at the highest capacity in 10 months!  Now, while these news items will actually help Silver and Gold more than they will help the rupee, I think the good overall feeling in India will continue to grow, and that will play well in the sandbox with the rupee. Speaking of the solar story being good for Silver. I just put the finishing touches on the July issue of the Review & Focus, and in it I go through the math of how Silver plays out in the production of megawatts solar panels. so, be sure to look for the R&F at a newsstand near you! No. wait Chuck! The R&F is only available to clients of EverBank World Markets! Oh well, you have a couple of weeks to sign up so you can receive this excellent letter each month! HA! And speaking of Gold. It added another $9 to its price yesterday. but the two darlings of the precious metals, Platinum and Palladium got whacked yesterday when the news of an apparent end to the mining strikes in S. Africa hit the streets. I think this was good for these two, given that they had really rallied recently and left a lot of investors behind. But now these investors can step into these metals at much cheaper prices and feel good about it! The fundamentals for all the metals haven’t changed, folks. The U.S. Data Cupboard will print the May PPI (wholesale inflation) reports this morning, but don’t expect PPI to pop out and surprise us. Year on year will probably print at a +2.4% clip, which doesn’t mean a hill of beans to me.  But what did mean a hill of beans to me was yesterday’s Retail Sales print from the Data Cupboard.  May Retail Sales disappointed everyone by only gaining .3%  instead of .6% that was expected.  Car Sales, which I had already told you would be strong, were the bulk of this report, which means consumer spending on other stuff, just wasn’t there. The markets didn’t look at it like that, instead they chose to look at how April’s anemic .1% gain was revised upward to .5%…  That’s quite a large “revision” don’t you think?  I find this revision to be suspect!  In my mind, how can grownups print that revision with a clear conscience? For What It’s Worth. My good friend, Dennis Miller, who writes an excellent letter for retirees or people getting close to retiring, like me!, sent me a note yesterday, and said that some data he saw showed  in the last 12 months Student Loans had increased $124 Billion, and the total for Student Loans was now greater than the total of Credit Card loans.  Hmmm, I thought, for a minute, and my mind immediately thought about how Student Loans last a very long time, while Credit Card loans might get paid off at any time.   So, that tells me that Student Loans are a bigger deal..  You may recall me venting earlier in the week about the President announcing some sort of bail out on Student Loans.  So, now I’m fuming. Then Alex Daley, the economist from the Casey Research group chimed in, and said that he had been screaming about this for a while. Let’s listen to what Alex had to say, “There is a bailout coming, as Student Loans are up 400% in 5 years, and non-payment rates have climbed 50% already, even with defaulting being nearly impossible legally.”   Now, I’m on fire! Smoke is coming out of my ears! I need to get some cold water thrown on me! Houston, we have a problem here. and it’s not a failure to communicate! It’s a problem surrounding not making people be responsible or accountable for what they sign up for!  It’s the storyline in this country that keeps getting more and more blown out of proportion, and will continue on that path, until it doesn’t. And then, people will wonder.. I wonder how this ever started in the first place.. Chuck again. Well, I never left actually! The FWIW section today was brought to you by ME! OK, stop acting silly, Chuck, this stuff is important! That’s right, I’m sorry. But I just can’t fight this any longer. I can rant and pound my fist till I turn blue, but it won’t do any good. There’s just no “accountability” any longer. It’s always someone else’s fault, and if you get in over your head, the Gov’t will bail you out. It’s all about the Gov’t’s need to make you more dependent on them, folks. when will people wake up and smell the coffee! To recap. The currencies and metals are mixed today. With pound sterling coming out on top as the best performer overnight, on some Carney promises. The Antipodean currencies saw profit taking or Central Bank intervention overnight. And China, and India both printed some good data or had good stories that should be good for the currencies going forward, and good for Silver and Gold.  U.S. Retail Sales for May were disappointing, but April was “revised” upward, very curiously I must say. Currencies today 6/13/14. American Style: A$ .9380, kiwi .8650, C$ .9210, euro 1.3575, sterling 1.6960, Swiss $1.1120, . European Style: rand 10.7740, krone 6.0080, SEK 6.6715, forint 226.85, zloty 3.0495, koruna 20.2640, RUB 34.47, yen 102.05, sing 1.2510, HKD 7.7515, INR 59.75, China 6.1503, pesos 13.02, BRL 2.2315, Dollar Index 80.63, Oil $107.05 (look at this soar, on the Iraq problems) , 10-year 2.60%, Silver $19.51, Platinum $1,443.75, Palladium $818.85, and Gold.. $1,272.90 That’s it for today. Well, my calendar popped up to tell me to not to forget that tomorrow is the 15 year anniversary for Jen Mclean at EverBank!  I could go on about how long Jen and I have worked together, but then that would be revealing her age!  Let’s just say, it’s been a few years, eh? Thanks for staying with me all these years, Jen. Well, the sun is coming up! Yes, the sun! We are supposed to have two days of sunshine here in St. Louis, with rain returning on Sunday. Sunday is Father’s Day. I miss my dad. But doesn’t everyone that has lost their dad? My dad was a tough guy, the Union steward for Teamsters 500, fought in WWII, but knew when someone needed love instead of a kick in the butt. He taught me so much, and I know I never told him I loved him near enough. So.. if your dad is still around, make sure to give him a hug, yes, guys even you.. and tell him you love him.  And just like on Mother’s Day weekend, I have a short poem for Dad. So, let’s go make this a Fantastico Friday, even though I’m going back to bed! Over the years As we grow old, We remember our father So brave and bold. In the garden, Leaning on the plow, He would listen to me; I see him now. He would give advice And understand; He was always there To lend a hand. God made fathers Strong and firm, For he knew our lives Would have great concerns. So he gave us fathers To teach us to pray, And guide our lives, And show us the way. So on his day Let’s take the time To say “Thanks, dad. I’m glad you’re mine.” Chuck Butler President EverBank World Marketslast_img read more

The good news in resourcerelated political risk c

first_imgThe good news in resource-related political risk continues: no new disasters, such as nationalization of a major mine. The Middle East remains in conflict, and Africa remains a dangerous place to do business, as has been the case for decades. The most alarming news for us was that Mexico’s Green Party just won a larger portion of the nation’s Congress. It remains a small minority with about 10% of the seats, but that’s more than the German green party… and look what it’s done. Worse, the green party is in alliance with the ruling PRI, which needs it to form a majority coalition. That means the ruling party has to give the greens a lot of what they want. Some of what the greens want is just crazy. However, Mexico is a place where poverty still abounds and the harsh facts of life still matter in politics. Nothing has actually changed yet, and the country does have a stable and workable mining code. It’s too soon to write the place off, but we’ll be watching it closely. Stupidity Watch There’s more bad news than good, as usual. Here’s the latest: June 2015: Top Five Countries This month’s top-scoring countries are: Sweden, Finland, Ireland, the US, and Canada. They are all considered very low risk. Ireland (Casey Country Score 0.06). Thanks to the combined effects of the Minerals Development Act in 1940 and a number of significant tax measures announced in 1956, Ireland has become one of the most pro-mining places in Europe and in the world. Zambia: News is out that Zambia is considering cutting the mineral royalties for underground mines. The cut would push the tax below the recently revised 9%. The original (now abandoned) tax hike saw the government charging as much as 20%. We hope common sense will eventually triumph over political stupidity. This Month’s Country Scores This month’s report examines 66 countries with significant mining activity. We plan to expand this to cover oil- and gas-producing countries and other resource industries. This month the focus remains on mining. Below are the individual country scores, followed by regional groupings and other notes. Europe looks the most investor friendly. The region includes both EU members and emerging European and Balkan countries, such as Russia and Serbia. This group is diverse, but on average its constituent countries tend to have stable and attractive investment climates, which makes them good mining jurisdictions. About the Casey Country Score Before we recommend a company, we always analyze the country (or countries) in which it operates. We examine the government’s level of support for mining, foreign investment, and private enterprise, and try to avoid countries with policies detrimental to investors. To this end, we tap multiple sources with knowledge of the country in question, including government officials, miners, geologists actually working on the ground, independent journalists, and NGOs. Whenever possible, we visit the country to see how the data measure up against the observable reality. It’s impossible, of course, to get our boots on the ground in all the countries we’re interested in as often as we’d like. So to fill the gap, we’ve developed the Casey Country Score (CCS) as a quick way to assess a country’s investment climate. The CCS measures multiple aspects of a country’s investment appeal, including the ease of registering property, investor protection, transparency of government institutions, and logistical infrastructure, among others. Lower scores are better. While the vast majority of countries receive a score between 0.0 and 1.0, some may slightly exceed 1.0 if, for example, they have high inflation in addition to other poor scores. Notes: 1] We designed the Casey Country Score to aggregate multiple ratings from such international organizations as the Fraser Institute, the World Bank, Transparency International, and others, and we augment that data with current indicators, such as inflation. The score gives more weight to mining-specific data than to indicators pegged to the economy as a whole, but of course, it reflects the overall investment climate in a country too. Our proprietary formula assigns a single score to each country. The results give us a rough but interesting insight into how countries stack up against each other as investment jurisdictions, for mining and in general. 2] As we’re focused on resource investments in the Casey International Speculator, the letter for which we created the CCS, we selected countries for this report where mining (excluding the oil and gas industry, but including nonmetals) is a significant industry. We used the size of the country’s mining industry in relation to its GDP as a benchmark and considered mainly those where the figure was 1% or more. 3] For Finland, Sweden, Serbia, and the United Kingdom, mining (excluding oil and gas) fell below our 1% benchmark according to the most recently available data. Yet these countries are interesting mining jurisdictions with a lot of investment opportunities. We made a judgment call and left them in. United States (Casey Country Score 0.08). The US ranking in the current Fraser survey dropped a tick, but with excellent infrastructure, low inflation, and high investor protection, it’s still a great mining jurisdiction overall. Some states are obviously not as mine friendly as the ones that rely heavily on mining in the West: Nevada, Wyoming, Idaho, Colorado, and Utah. This is well understood by both resource investors and the Canada-listed mining companies that operate there. The Big Picture: Regions Sweden (Casey Country Score 0.04). Sweden is a jurisdiction with excellent infrastructure and famously low corruption and inflation. The country features high-quality geological databases and readily available exploration services. Australia scored very well in the Fraser Survey, the World Bank’s report, and the Corruption Perceptions Index. We tend to agree with this result: the country is a good mining jurisdiction, much better than the Asia & Oceania average. There are other outliers in each group that can render a regional average less useful, and we always look at individual countries to determine if they’re worth our investing consideration.center_img Important points to note: Canada (Casey Country Score 0.08). Canada is another country with a long-established mining industry and an extremely favorable investment climate in the majority of its provinces. We don’t have any particular concerns about Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec, among other Canadian provinces, when it comes to mining friendliness. There can be variances within a country between its administrative divisions, such as provinces in Argentina or states in Brazil and the US, and each can have significantly different investment appeal. Mongolia: Khan Resources petitioned a US court to weigh in on its protracted dispute with Mongolia. The move comes after the country decided to invalidate a $100 million arbitration claim by the Canadian company. Our view remains that Mongolia’s intention to revoke Khan’s claims was monumentally stupid. It will make it that much harder to attract investment, which the country badly needs. Finland (Casey Country Score 0.05). Finland is a top Fraser Survey jurisdiction and was an undisputed leader in most of the other reports we drew input from. We note, however, that while stable, government processes in Finland can be very slow. Peru: Violent protests against the Tia Maria copper mine rocked Peru again last month. Five deaths and many more injured reported so far. The government declared a state of emergency in the region. The conflict is suspended, but the truce looks fragile. Louis James has provided his take on the situation. Short version: the government is pro-mining, but don’t invest in companies in Peru unless they can convince you they have strong local support. Romania: The country has hiked taxes for mining activities by just under 7%. The government says it wants to align tax rates with inflation. Romania last touched mining taxes in 2013, when it upped them by a whopping 28%. Not a good trend. And stupid: it makes no sense to raise taxes on a business that has almost ground to a halt in your country but which could attract foreign investment, if the politicians would just let it be. Chile: Country’s environmental regulator has filed charges against Canadian miner Lundin Mining Corporation. The reason: alleged environmental violations in its Candelaria copper deposit located in Chile’s Atacama region. It may be that the company is at fault and the authorities are just doing their jobs. We haven’t been down there to check. But the move is part of an ongoing pushback against mining, so view this as another turn toward economic stupidity in Chile. European Union: Last month European Parliament voted in favor of a mandatory certification system for importers of so-called conflict minerals. The bill is largely aimed at Africa, where minerals play a role in several violent conflicts. As a result, 800,000 European companies will have to ensure that revenues from the minerals they use are not funding conflicts. The move doesn’t really affect our investments but is an interesting example of stupid regulation in the EU that will tax business and make not one bit of difference to the people it’s intended to help.last_img read more

If youve ever seen someone with testicles get kic

first_imgIf you’ve ever seen someone with testicles get kicked in the groin, then you probably know that male genitals — often portrayed as a symbol of male strength and virility — aren’t actually that tough.But can testicles — or rather, the sperm they produce — be harmed by something as seemingly innocent as a pair of briefs?A study published Wednesday in the journal Human Reproduction finds lower sperm counts in people who wear tight-fitting underwear. But some experts question whether undergarment choice could make a meaningful difference for fertility.If it does matter, it all comes to down to temperature. As it turns out, a man’s love spuds just can’t take the heat.”Any exposure [to heat] that significantly increases temperature is likely to affect spermatogenesis [or sperm production],” says Dr. Jorge Chavarro, associate professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and an author on the study. “That’s the main reason we have scrotums and testes that are external to the abdomen.”By hanging below the torso, testicles stay cooler — by about 4 to 6 degrees, typically — than the rest of the body. That helps them make happy, functional sperm cells. But when you slap on a pair of briefs, that natural cooling system is disrupted. Your dangly bits are held close to your abdomen and they heat up, harming sperm production.At least, that’s one hypothesis. Several studies have examined this issue, but Chavarro says many of them weren’t large enough, or yielded inconclusive results. Chavarro wanted to know whether the type of underwear worn really influenced sperm count.To do that, he’d have to look at some sperm. Lots of it.In their study, Chavarro and his team examined semen samples from 656 men. These men were selected from couples seeking infertility treatments at Massachusetts General Hospital between 2000 and 2017.Each man had filled out a survey for the clinic that included a question about what underwear he typically wore. This allowed Chavarro to compare men who wore boxers to men who wore tighter-fitting underwear like briefs or bikinis.After correcting for a number of factors, such as age and weight, the researchers saw a trend. “We found that men who wear looser underwear had significantly higher sperm concentration and total sperm count compared to men who wear tighter underwear,” Chavarro says.But Chavarro notes that even though the average sperm count was lower in men who wore tight-fitting underwear instead of boxers, this value was still well within healthy levels. That suggests the difference between underwear types shouldn’t be overblown, Chavarro says.”For most men, it probably doesn’t make a lot of difference,” he says. “The men who are most likely to benefit are the men who are on the border – who have relatively low sperm count.”Even with Chavarro’s caveats, some experts aren’t convinced. Germaine Louis, dean of the College of Health and Human Services at George Mason University, published a similar study in 2016 examining semen from 473 men, and failed to detect differences in sperm count or fertility outcomes.”There’s absolutely no difference in how long it took people to get pregnant whether [the men] were wearing briefs or boxers,” Louis says.She worries that underwear guidance would only add stress to the equation.”Couples are already stressed out enough when they’re trying for a pregnancy,” Lewis says. “We just don’t need to introduce any other stressors.”Still, Chavarro says that switching to boxers is relatively cheap compared to most fertility treatments. For couples trying to improve their chance at a pregnancy, changing the man’s underwear habits could be low-hanging fruit.”This is something that’s a relatively easy change to do,” Chavarro says. “It involves them going to buy new underwear, but that’s a relatively low-cost intervention.”Dr. Bruce Gilbert, professor of urology at the Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, says Chavarro and his colleagues ignored several factors that may have influenced sperm count, such as the type of pants typically worn by each patient. Wearing tight jeans, for instance, could outweigh any benefits derived from wearing loose boxers.”If people were just running around this world in underwear that would be one thing,” he says. “But you and I and most people are going to be wearing something over our underwear.”Plus, the questionnaire was vaguely worded, Gilbert says, and should have included more specific questions about each patient’s behavior. “I would like a bit more information from their set of patients before I change what I tell my patients,” Gilbert says. “I can’t say this is going to change my clinical practice.” Paul Chisholm is an intern on NPR’s Science desk. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Fourteenyearold Caydden Zimmermans school days

first_imgFourteen-year-old Caydden Zimmerman’s school days start early and end late.He has a 90-minute bus ride to get from the homeless shelter where he is staying in Boise, Idaho, to his middle school. He wakes up at 5:45 a.m., quickly brushes his teeth and smooths some gel in his hair, and then he dashes downstairs to catch his school bus.About 2.5 million children in the U.S. currently are homeless, according to the National Center on Family Homelessness. That number is rising as house prices and rental costs continue to grow in cities large and small, and the trend is clearly visible in Boise — the fastest-growing city in the nation.Caydden has been living at City Light Home For Women and Children for a couple of months now with his 11-year-old brother, Keston, and his grandma, Pam Cantrell. Cantrell says they moved there after getting an eviction notice at their former duplex.”The landlord decided to sell the property, and we just could not find a place we could afford,” Cantrell says. “The more I looked, the more depressed I got. I just, I didn’t know what to do.”Like Cantrell and her grandsons, many low-income families in Boise struggle to find housing they can afford. Cantrell gets a small disability stipend from the government, but that’s nowhere near enough to cover rent and other expenses.The boys’ mother is addicted to drugs and struggles with mental illness, Cantrell says, which is why grandma is the boys’ full-time caretaker now.”I grew up being alone, raised by my older brother and my grandma,” Caydden says. “She means everything. Without her I wouldn’t be here. I’d probably be dead somewhere.”After three months of searching, the shelter became their only option. Cantrell is grateful to have a place to stay but says not having a permanent home is really hard on her grandsons.”My youngest one, he can be a little terror, because he’s upset by it,” Cantrell says. “He gets angry, and he’ll sit in the corner and say, ‘I hate this place, I hate this place.’ “”It’s just an effort to try not to break down”It’s difficult for Caydden too, but you wouldn’t know it. Caydden is a social 14-year-old with a big smile. One of his favorite things about school is seeing his friends.”My friends know about it — me being homeless — they don’t tease me on it,” Caydden says. “They just know that I’m doing it, I’m trying to work hard. And it’s just an effort to try not to break down.”Homeless kids tend to score lower on standardized tests and have lower graduation rates. It’s harder to concentrate when you’re anxious and worried. And sometimes Caydden does break down with his friends.”They always bring me up when I’m feeling down,” he says. “They make me smile when I’m sad.”Caydden’s grades have improved since he started at this alternative middle school for students who struggle in traditional academic settings. The school district received a grant to pay for a bus to transport homeless students who are scattered across the Boise area.Homeless students often bounce around to different schools as their living situations change. That can make it nearly impossible to keep up, so Pathways Middle School Principal Eric Eschen wants to do everything he can to keep tabs on students like Caydden.”He’s a very positive student, very giving, a very good friend,” Eschen says. He points to a recent time when Caydden approached him to alert him that another student was making a mess with mustard in the bathroom. He took it as a sign that Caydden cares about the community and the school. For homeless kids, sometimes school can be a place of refuge and consistency in an otherwise hectic and messy world.Eschen keeps an eye on Caydden because, like a lot of students in his situation, he struggled with absences last year.”That really affected him and affected his progress, so we’ve got some catch-up to do this year,” Eschen says.At the end of the school day, it’s another 90-minute bus ride before Caydden meets his grandma on the steps of the homeless shelter. They wait outside for Caydden’s brother to arrive on another bus. Meanwhile, Caydden checks in with Cantrell about the week’s schedule.”Grandma, on Friday are you just going to go in and wait for me and Keston?” he says. “Cause you’ve got laundry.””Yeah, I probably will,” Cantrell says. She has to keep Caydden apprised of her comings and goings at the shelter so that he won’t worry.Growing up fastCaydden has had to grow up faster than your typical 14-year-old. With his dad out of the picture and his mom’s drug addiction, he often had to be responsible for his little brother.”Help get him ready for school, I had to make sure Mom wasn’t … gone,” Caydden says. “I had to feed Keston when Mom was passed out for days. There was one time when we only had cereal for, like, two weeks.”Caydden has been trying to convince his grandma that she should let him get a job so he can help with rent. He’d like to earn money at a fast-food restaurant or, at the least, raking leaves and shoveling snow.”It’s like something I want to do,” Caydden says. “I just want to help out.”But Cantrell, aware that her grandson has already been through more than most teenagers, won’t have it.”You are not getting a job. You need to be a child as long as possible, Caydden,” she says, patting his knee. “You don’t want to be in a big hurry to grow up, honey.””This is home!”A few weeks later, there’s good news in Caydden’s world — they found a house. It’s about 700 square feet that they share with another woman from the shelter. Caydden sleeps in the basement, in a tiny room with concrete walls and a small window. Cantrell and Keston sleep on inflatable mattresses in the living room.”It’s not the greatest, but it’s not the worst,” Cantrell says. She’s been working on sprucing up the place. She plans to brighten up the living room with fresh paint.But for Caydden, it’s a huge improvement.”I feel much more comfortable and safe,” he says. He loves that the house is near Boise State University and has a weed-filled backyard that backs up to an alley. On football game days, he figured out that he can sell parking spots in the yard to game-goers.”Last weekend we made 90 bucks!” Caydden says. He’s scheming about trying to sell sodas on game day, too.But probably most importantly, he can claim something he hasn’t been able to for quite some time:”This is home!” he says, smiling.This story was produced by the Mountain West News Bureau. Copyright 2018 Boise State Public Radio. To see more, visit Boise State Public Radio.last_img read more

Disabled campaigners and their allies have called

first_imgDisabled campaigners and their allies have called on the transport secretary to restore “vital” government funding for projects to improve access to rail stations across England, Wales and Scotland.In a letter signed by more than 50 organisations, Transport for All (TfA) – which campaigns for an accessible transport system – calls on Chris Grayling to restore tens of millions of pounds of funding for the Access for All scheme that has been deferred by the government.The letter says that deferring half of all planned Access for All projects means that the “already slow progress on rail access has all but ground to a halt”.The decision by the chair of Network Rail – later rubber-stamped by Grayling – to cut Access for All funding for 2014-19 from £102 million to £55 million, with the rest carried over to 2019-24, was first revealed by Disability News Service last year.The letter has been sent as Grayling is due today (Thursday) to announce future levels of Network Rail funding, which TfA says provides an “opportunity to get things back on track”.But the department’s Accessibility Action Plan, published in August, pledges only that the government will deliver funding already announced – including the deferred funding – in full, and that it will “continue to seek to extend the Access for All programme further in the future”.The letter calls on Grayling to instead “invest in the potential of Deaf and disabled people” and reverse the decision to defer the Access for All funding, as well as commit to further Access for All funding after 2020 through “an ambitious long-term plan for making our railways fully accessible”.It tells Grayling that it is an “injustice” for Deaf, disabled and older people to be “locked out of our rail network”, and that accessible stations also benefit parents with buggies, dog-owners and people with luggage.The letter says government figures show that any money spent improving rail accessibility pays back nearly three times that amount in economic benefits, while an accessible station can mean “the difference between work and unemployment, a lifeline to friends and family or isolation”.The Transport for All letter has been signed by disabled people’s organisations including Inclusion London, Disability Sheffield, Ealing Centre for Independent Living, Kingston Centre for Independent Living, People First (Self Advocacy), Regard, Shaping Our Lives, Asian People’s Disability Alliance and Real.They say that nearly 80 per cent of rail stations across the UK do not have full step-free access, while many others do not have the other necessary access features such as tactile paving, audio-visual information and induction loops that enable Deaf and disabled people to use them.A Department for Transport spokeswoman said: “We take the issue of accessibility across all modes of transport very seriously and are continuing to improve station access through the Access for All programme and other major projects.“By 2019 at least 75 per cent of all journeys will be from stations with step-free access.“The Accessibility Action Plan is the next step in a much-needed dialogue with disabled people, carers, transport providers and local authorities to identify new ways to improve travel. “We also secured commitments from the rail industry earlier this year to help make journeys better for disabled people.”last_img read more

Maryland Marijuana Sales Double the Forecast

first_img Each week hear inspiring stories of business owners who have taken the cannabis challenge and are now navigating the exciting but unpredictable Green Rush. –shares Image credit: LPETTET | Getty Images Guest Writer Only a year into legal medical marijuana sales, Maryland is the latest to join the list of states blowing away projections for cannabis sales. In Maryland’s case, it’s actually double what was expected.Cannabis research firm New Frontier Data originally estimated that the first full calendar year of medical marijuana sales in Maryland — which started in December 2017 — would come in around $46 million. However, a spokesperson for the firm recently told the Baltimore Sun that sales for all of 2018 will reach $100 million in December.Additionally, the state reported at the beginning of December that sales had reached $96 million in the first 12 months of sales between December 2017 and November 2018. Between 250 and 350 people have been applying on average every day to get approved by the state for purchasing cannabis products. The state also reported there have been 1.99 million transactions at dispensaries.Related: Oregon Marijuana Sales Soared 29 Percent in 2018. So Why Aren’t More Entrepreneurs Happy? Slow Start, Fast FinishIt’s worth noting that this is just the first year. Both the Sun and other Maryland media outlets reported that dispensary owners had a slow start in the first half of 2018. However, things changed around Labor Day, Marc Spataro, owner of the Chesacana dispensary, told CBS Baltimore.He tied the surge in sales partly to people just becoming aware of the ability to buy marijuana, as well as a need by many to use something other than manufactured pharmaceuticals to handle issues such as pain – a common argument among medical marijuana proponents.“The growth will continue at a rapid rate,” he predicted.Related: US Cannabis Leaders are Carefully Watching the Looming Canadian Wave Exceeding ExpectationsMore than doubling projections is dramatic. But what’s happening in Maryland is typical for states selling both creational and medical marijuana. Looks at these numbers:California sold $445 million in marijuana in the third quarter of 2018 aloneIn the first five days of legal sales in Massachusetts, $2.2 million in cannabis was sold. Dispensaries in the state were making about $200,000 per day.Sales in Oregon has soared 29 percent in 2018, with the potential for becoming a $543 million marketColorado, the first state to have legal recreational marijuana sales, shows what a mature market might look like. The most recent projections from the state have sales in 2018 slightly exceeding the $1.5 billion in marijuana sold in 2017.The numbers are backing up what experts in the industry have said along — the market is massive for marijuana. Look no further than these numbers to understand why more and more political leaders are getting behind marijuana, and the talk of crackdowns and prohibition is burning out.Follow dispensaries.com on Instagram to stay up to date on the latest cannabis news. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. December 21, 2018 Growth Matters Add to Queue dispensaries.com Green Entrepreneur Podcast It’s just the latest state to far exceed sales expectations. Next Article Listen Now Easy Search. Quality Finds. Your partner and digital portal for the cannabis community. Maryland Marijuana Sales Double the Forecast 3 min readlast_img read more

Russian Hacking Ring Steals More Than a Billion Passwords

first_img Enroll Now for $5 Add to Queue Guest Writer Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Russian Hacking Ring Steals More Than a Billion Passwords Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Next Article Hackerscenter_img –shares Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Blink, and there’s another headline about yet another data breach. First, it was Target. Then, in quick succession, Neiman Marcus and Michaels announced data breaches of their own. More recently – just this past Monday, in fact — P.F. Chang’s said that customers’ credit-card information at 33 of its locations had been compromised.Back in January, the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation warned retailers to expect more attacks.They weren’t joking. Turns out, the rash of reported attacks represents just a small fraction of the personal data already stolen by hackers.Related: P.F. Chang’s Says Credit-Card Breach Affected 33 RestaurantsBeginning in earnest this April, a Russian crime ring has collected the largest known stockpile of stolen online credentials, making off with 1.2 billion user name and password combinations and more than 500 million email addresses, The New York Times reported.This wide-scale hack job, which was brought to light by the cybersecurity firm Holden Security, targeted over 420,000 websites ranging from big-name companies to smaller websites, the firm wrote in a blog post.“Hackers did not just target U.S. companies, they targeted any website they could get, ranging from Fortune 500 companies to very small websites,” Alex Holden, the founder and chief information security officer of Hold Security, told the Times. “And most of these sites are still vulnerable.” In part for this reason, the firm has declined to identify a list of victims.All of this havoc was can be traced back to less than a dozen men in their 20s living in a small city in south central Russia, the Times reported. For now, it appears these guys are primarily using the stolen data to spam Twitter for other groups, charging a fee for the service.Related: Target, Neiman Marcus Hacks Could Be More Widespread, Experts SayThis, the Times noted, isn’t the best business strategy: “Selling more of the records on the black market would be lucrative.”Because people tend to use the same password for multiple sites, a single password, along with other stolen credentials, can be very valuable. Let’s say a thief gains access to your password for a retail site; he or she can then test it to try and access your bank account. (In other words, if your password for multiple sites – scratch that, any site – is “12345,” please change it now).This, of course, will not be the last time a massive security breach makes headlines. Do yourself a favor, then, and beef up your password security before the next attack is unearthed. Related: Your Password Is 123456? Wow. Seriously? Laura Entis 3 min read August 6, 2014last_img read more

Slingshot Facebooks Snapchat Competitor Is Now Officially a Snapchat Clone

first_img Next Article Add to Queue Slingshot, Facebook’s Snapchat Competitor, Is Now Officially a Snapchat Clone Guest Writer –shares Laura Entis Mobile Apps September 5, 2014center_img Poke, Facebook’s failed first attempt at developing a Snapchat competitor, was essentially a direct rip-off of the service. Slingshot, its sophomore effort that launched in June, had one distinguishing feature that saved it from a similar clone status: In order for users to open a message on the service, they had to first “sling” (i.e. return) a message of their own back to the sender.Ultimately, the feature was built to encourage engagement and discourage lurking. “With Slingshot, we wanted to build something where everybody is a creator and nobody is just a spectator,” Facebook said in a blog post announcing the launch.As we wrote then, Facebook was likely underestimating social media users’ collective desire to consume content versus create it. Forcing individuals to respond to a message before opening it makes for a disjointed, strangely high-pressure messaging experience.Related: Facebook Launches Slingshot, Its Snapchat CompetitorSo it’s not all that surprising that just over two months after Slingshot’s launch, Facebook has killed this reciprocity feature.As spotted by The Next Web, when users send a photo or video in response to one from a friend, they’ll receive a message that reads “Sling a shot to see a shot? Not necessarily! After shooting a photo or video, now you can choose whether to sling it as a locked or unlocked shot.”Allowing users to freely lurk may help the service gain traction, but it also completely negates Facebook’s claim that Slingshot is not a Snapchat cloneIt totally is now. To be fair, it’s far from the only one — earlier this summer Instagram launched Bolt, its own Snapchat rip-off.Related: This Is the 23-Year-Old Entrepreneur Who Just Turned Down $3 Billion From Facebook 2 min read Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Register Now »last_img read more

Marvin Minsky AI Pioneer Dies at 88

first_img The world lost one of its brightest minds to a brain hemorrhage recently.Marvin Minsky was 88 when he passed on Sunday night. A World War II veteran, his life’s work was essentially creating and advancing the field of artificial intelligence. The New York Times has eulogized the Turing Award winner, writing that when Minsky was choosing his career path he “ruled out genetics as interesting but not profound, and physics as mildly entertaining, he chose to focus on intelligence itself.”This is a man who, in 1951, built the premiere “randomly wired neural network learning machine.” He also built the first confocal scanning microscope (read: extremely powerful) at Harvard in 1956.Two years later, along with John McCarthy (the man credited with naming “artificial intelligence”), he cofounded and taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s venerable A.I. lab. The man who wants to resurrect his father as an AI construct via paper records, Ray Kurzweil, was one of his students there too. Hell, director Stanley Kubrick even consulted him during pre-production on 2001: A Space Odyssey to get his take on whether or not computers would be able to speak by the year 2001.Saying he was brilliant would be a vast understatement, and I can’t possibly list all of his accomplishments here. But, that’s what NYT’s exhaustive memorial is for. Godspeed, sir. Timothy J. Seppala January 26, 2016 This story originally appeared on Engadget 2 min read Enroll Now for $5 –shares Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Next Article center_img Image credit: Bcjordan | Wikimedia Commons Writer Obituaries Marvin Minsky Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Add to Queue Marvin Minsky, AI Pioneer, Dies at 88last_img read more

Google Flights Will Alert You About Expected Price Changes

first_img Next Article Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Google Flights Will Alert You About Expected Price Changes This story originally appeared on PCMag Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. The web giant wants to help eliminate some of the guesswork of trying to get the best deals on travel. Image credit: Shutterstock.com 2 min read Add to Queuecenter_img October 18, 2016 Angela Moscaritolo Google –shares Reporter We’ve all heard it before: it’s best to book a flight on Tuesday at 3 p.m. ET to get the lowest fare. But is that really true? That’s still up for debate, but now you can eliminate some of the guesswork when trying to get the best deals on travel, thanks to Google.Just in time for holiday travel planning, the web giant on Monday updated Google Flights with a feature that will show you when prices are expected to increase for specific flights and the routes in which you’re interested. The update also promises to make it easier to find good hotel deals and plan your trip on a mobile device. Now, when you select a specific flight, you may get a notification letting you know when the current fare is expected to expire and how much you can save if you book right away. If you’re looking at a certain route, but aren’t set on a specific flight, Google may display a notification bar with tips for finding the best price, including recommendations for alternate airports or dates and expected price changes based on past prices for that route.Google may, for instance, tell you something like “historically, 90 percent of the time the cheapest price on this route increased 7 days before departure by about $52.”You can opt to track a specific flight or route and receive email notifications letting you know when prices are expected to change. In the past, Google would only notify you when prices actually did increase or decrease significantly.Google plans to roll out these new fare expiration and expected price jump notifications over the coming weeks everywhere its Flights tool is available.Meanwhile, Google is also offering a better flight-finding experience on mobile devices with new features to let you track and manage your saved flights on your phone. There’s also a new tab called “Deals” when searching for hotels that will show places offering cheaper-than-normal lodging in your selected destination. Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

Denver May Become the First US City to Legalize Marijuana Use in

first_img The Colorado measure will permit private businesses to allow marijuana use by adults in designated areas with certain exceptions. North Carolina superintendent says new app can help reduce violence in schools Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day Keep up with the latest trends and news in the cannabis industry with our free articles and videos, plus subscribe to the digital edition of Green Entrepreneur magazine. –shares A Safe Way to Get Rid Of Bugs in Your Home Congress Is Back as President Trump Heads to the UK Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use Sunlight Shines on Grand Canyon Former world paragliding champion Rémy soars over Pyrenees Memorial Day Weekend Heat Wave Could Smash May Records Add to Queue The requested video is no longer available Embed 2 Musts for Tackling Allergy Season Delicious Summer Entertaining Ideas New York takes aim at skyscrapers’ sky-high energy usage Sophie Turner Talks Dark Phoenix, Co-Star Jessica Chastain and GoT Cannes: ticketless festival-goers seek seats for films Summer Beauty Survival Must-Haves This story originally appeared on Reuters US Navy: Russian destroyer almost collided with cruiser in the Philippine Sea Saint Laurent dazzles with men’s collection on Malibu beach 2 Musts for Tackling Allergy Season 2020 Toyota Camry Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day 2020 Ballots May Have a New Box to Check ? Vice President A Petition Is Coming ? for a ‘Game of Thrones’ Final Season Do-Over Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day Father’s Day is such a special moment for the whole family to come together and spend quality time with one another – and those are moments dad will cherish. What better way for dad to connect with his loved ones than learning about his family’s stor Lifeminute tv Memorial Day Weekend Heat Wave Could Smash May Records A LifeMinute with Ryan Seacrest A measure that would make Denver the first city in the United States to legalize the use of marijuana in such venues as clubs, bars and restaurants is expected to get enough votes to pass, backers and opponents of the initiative said on Tuesday.The announcement comes amid a string of victories for proponents of medical and recreational marijuana use, with voters in California and Massachusetts approving ballot initiatives legalizing recreational use of the drug last week.The Colorado measure will permit private businesses to allow marijuana use by adults in designated areas with certain exceptions. Backers of the initiative said it would make Denver the first city in the country where cannabis enthusiasts can enjoy the drug socially without fear of arrest.  “This is a victory for cannabis consumers who, like alcohol consumers, simply want the option to enjoy cannabis in social settings,” Kayvan Khalatbari, a Denver businessman and lead proponent of the so-called I-300 measure, said in a statement on Tuesday.While other states have authorized similar plans, Khalatbari said Denver would be the first to actually implement them. He said businesses in the city could start opening their doors to pot users as soon as late January.Approval for Denver’s initiative was leading in preliminary vote totals from last week’s election. While the city’s elections agency said they would not certify results until next Tuesday, campaigns that supported and opposed the measure both agreed it had passed.Rachel O’Bryan, the campaign manager for the opposition group Protect Denver’s Atmosphere, said by phone there did not appear to be enough outstanding ballots for the measure to fail.”Back in 2012, marijuana legalization passed with a strong majority in Denver … and now about four years later, I-300 passed with a much smaller margin. We think many voters voted in favor of marijuana legalization, but didn’t want to see marijuana everywhere,” she said.She said the bill’s opponents are concerned about public safety as well as issues of second-hand smoke indoors. O’Bryan said she hopes the city council and possibly the state’s Attorney General will closely examine the law to see if it runs afoul of provisions in state law barring public pot use.Recreational marijuana was first approved in 2012 by the states of Washington and Colorado, and later by voters in Oregon, Alaska and the District of Columbia. California, Massachusetts and Nevada all approved recreational use after voting last Tuesday.(Reporting by Curtis Skinner in San Francisco, editing by G Crosse) BACK Photo of solider placing flag at Tomb of Unknown Solider goes viral Denver May Become the First U.S. City to Legalize Marijuana Use in Bars and Restaurants Download Our iOS App Heat Snapshot DiCaprio, Pitt want to team up again after Tarantino hit Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day IndyCar Beefing Up Business as Indy 500 Approaches A LifeMinute with John Lithgow: The Actor Discusses His Latest Projects Turning Up the Heat in the Southeast for Holiday Weekend Next Article Free Green Entrepreneur App Economy adds 75K jobs in May HBO’s ‘Chernobyl’ Phenomenon Southern Charm’ Star Talks New Season How Human Behavior is Hurting Animals and What We Can Do to Protect Them A Safe Way to Get Rid Of Bugs in Your Home IHOP Sees Explosive Growth in To-Go Sales November 16, 2016 Airbnb Wants to Take You on an All-Inclusive Adventure Cannes: ticketless festival-goers seek seats for films 2 Delicious Summer Entertaining Ideas Sophie Turner Talks Dark Phoenix, Co-Star Jessica Chastain and GoT Summer is here and there are some great looks this season for women of all shapes and sizes. Check out the hottest styles for hourglass, rectangle and pear shaped women. Economy adds 75K jobs in May Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day Up Next: A Petition Is Coming ? for a ‘Game of Thrones’ Final Season Do-Over Swimwear Styles for All Shapes and Sizes Airbnb Wants to Take You on an All-Inclusive Adventure 3 min read Marijuana Albany Steps Closer to Releasing Trump’s State Tax Returns After Assembly Vote Beyond Meat Earnings Are Beyond Analyst Expectations Summer Beauty Survival Must-Haves Autoplay: On | Off Justin Bieber Launches Plant-Based Deodorant Reuters Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Guitarist Don ‘Fingers’ Felder Releases New Albumlast_img read more

Federal grant awarded to Indiana University researcherentrepreneur for startup

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 10 2018A high-tech startup founded by an Indiana University researcher-entrepreneur has been awarded a federal grant to develop technology that aims to reduce the use of animals in chemical toxicity studies of food, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and other products.Dream Tech LLC has received a one-year STTR Phase I award worth $245,130 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, or NCATS. Kan Shao, an assistant professor of environmental and occupational health at the IU School of Public Health, founded the company.Related StoriesExpediting HPLC Method Development in Pharmaceutical AnalysisMaking Laboratories More Efficient with the Most Modern LIMS on the MarketLABVOLUTION: A digitized lab environment to be showcased at smartLAB 2019″Dream Tech is developing a method to incorporate existing information to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of dose-response assessment, which addresses a chemical’s toxicity. This would reduce animal use in traditional toxicity studies,” Shao said. “The project supported by the STTR grant will make this the first system able to integrate useful information. It will significantly advance chemical risk assessment.”Shao said receiving an STTR grant from NCATS, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, is prestigious recognition for Dream Tech.”Applying for STTR funding is a very rigorous process, especially in meeting the high expectations of NCATS experts as they conduct scientific review and council review,” Shao said. “Being awarded one of these ultra-competitive grants reinforces our belief that Dream Tech and its work can help others.”Shao disclosed his innovation to the IU Innovation and Commercialization Office, which protects, markets and licenses intellectual property developed at Indiana University so it can be commercialized by industry. He licensed the innovation and launched Dream Tech to commercialize it. Source:https://news.iu.edu/stories/2018/10/iub/releases/04-dream-tech-receives-sttr-grant.htmllast_img read more