Howard Webb retires from refereeing

first_imgHoward Webb has retired from refereeing to take up the role of Technical Director of Professional Game Match Officials Limited (PGMOL).The 43-year-old, a former policeman, built up a reputation as one of the best officials in the game.He has taken charge of some of the biggest matches in the Premier League over the course of his 25-year career, as well as an FA Cup final, League Cup final and Community Shield.In 2010, he became the first person to referee the finals of both the UEFA Champions League and the World Cup.He recently officiated at the 2014 World Cup and was widely praised for his handling of Brazil’s last 16 clash with Chile.But he has now opted to hang up his whistle to work for PGMOL, the body responsible for the training and development of match officials operating in the Premier League, Football League and FA competitions.Webb will oversee the technical direction and standards that govern the on-field performance of PGMOL’s match officials.He will also manage the PGMOL training programme and coaching system and will work extensively on the successful development programme that provides a pathway for referees from Level 3 through to the Select Group.Additionally Webb, who will report to PGMOL General Manager Mike Riley, will take a public-facing role, informing and educating on refereeing matters.“I am very excited to start this new chapter in my career after a wonderfully rewarding 25 years on the pitch,” Webb said. “I have spent over a decade with the best seat in the house for Barclays Premier League matches, been lucky enough to be involved in nine UEFA and FIFA tournaments, and taken charge of the UEFA Champions League and FIFA World Cup finals.“Refereeing has given me so much and it’s important that match officials who have had the rewards remain in the game to pass on their knowledge. I also have much more to learn about the business of refereeing and the best place for me to do that is with PGMOL. It’s an incredibly positive working environment and we all have a common goal of improving refereeing.“Over the last five years in particular we have made huge strides in terms of our accuracy, fitness and professionalism. The current Select Group are the best referees this country has ever produced and I am thrilled that I not only get the chance to continue working with them but also the opportunity to help develop the next generation of Select Group officials.” 1 Howard Webb last_img read more

Nokia prototype twist bend tap steal show w video

first_img The prototype has an OLED display. A user can get in and out by bending the handset back and forth. The user can manage menus by twisting and bending the device in different directions. In so many words, Nokia’s think squad has imagined a mobile device that can behave according to how it is flexed.The prototype demonstrated at Nokia World is from the Nokia Research Center (NRC). “The demo shows how intuitive and simple user interactions can be just by bending and twisting,” says the Center’s notes. The NRC also points out that Nokia is nowhere near the suggestion that the new screen invention is to replace the standard touchscreen. Instead, the concept is intended to suggest another option. As options go, the device is seen as useful for certain circumstances. Those include very cold climates where touchscreens may not be easily operated. The device can work even when a person is wearing gloves.Yet another talking point in this week’s reports on the prototype is that it is a potentially useful device for the blind. One can get the device to work without having to look at it. The bending properties don’t need vision. Citation: Nokia prototype: twist, bend, tap, steal show (w/ video) (2011, October 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-10-nokia-prototype-video.html This is not the last innovation we are likely to see in mobile device designs. The prototype is the latest in a succession of concepts that seek to enhance the mobile experience. As computing gets more mobile it clearly gets more inventively tactile. Innovative ways of handling smartphones, tablets, and other devices always draw crowds. Some observers at the London show noted the past interest in the introduction of the Synapse concept phone with squeeze sensors. This was demonstrated as a phone that the user can control by squeezing the sides or running a finger across a touchpad on the backside. Fuse was announced as a collaboration between Synaptics, Texas Instruments, Alloy, Immersion, and The Astonishing Tribe.The Nokia demo appears as something that could be applied to smartphones as well as tablets. The demo’s screen size was a little less than five inches.Asked when the device will be brought to market, the answer from the company representative was a vague, “Soon” but quickly followed by the comment, “It depends on how big the demand is in the market.” Still, those who have seen the device at the Nokia event or watched the videos generally agree that the time spent was fun and worthwhile, as the concept is a reminder of all the future innovations in mobile technology still in the wings. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Nokia N80 gets best in mobile image devicecenter_img (PhysOrg.com) — The talk of the Nokia Show in London this week was a demo that had admiring visitors wishing the little device was beyond Cool-Idea Prototype and instead a launch with dates in place for stores and online shopping sites. The mind-bender, though not fully baked, is a hand-bender, namely a flexible kinetic device. The Nokia prototype allows the user to do tasks like pan through photos, zoom in and out, select and pause music, all by twisting, bending, bowing, and tapping the corners of the device. The prototype is, for now, simply named Nokia kinetic device. © 2011 PhysOrg.com Explore furtherlast_img read more

BBC show Life Story Google will have a raft of BBC

first_imgBBC show Life StoryGoogle will have a raft of BBC content on its relaunched Google Earth service.The internet giant is refreshing its maps and mapping service and has struck a deal with BBC Worldwide, the commercial arm of the UK public broadcaster, and Earth will now have BBC footage from what it calls its Natural Treasures collection.Natural Treasures will sit within a revamped feature on Earth called Voyager, which launches today.Google Earth users will be able to journey through 30 locations via the BBC footage, across six habitats: islands, deserts, grasslands, mountains, cities and jungles.The BBC said users can embark upon curated journeys, with filmed insights from its wildlife producers, imagery and clips from series including Life Story, Africa and Planet Earth II.There will also be video from the BBC’s app The Story of Life including various Sir David Attenborough’s clips.“We’re delighted to be strengthening our decade-long partnership with Google by pursuing a common goal to bring audiences everywhere even closer to our incredible planet,” said Jackie Lee-Joe, chief marketing officer at BBC Worldwide.Through this partnership, we’re leveraging BBC Worldwide’s iconic brand and content to deliver audiences a new way to experience the natural world. The BBC has been capturing and sharing the natural world for over 60 years, and now we’re further innovating how we tell these stories.”last_img read more