Business expo set Thursday

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WHITTIER – The 2006 Grand Slam Business Expo is expected to attract more than 100 businesses to the Radisson Hotel on Thursday in Uptown Whittier. The expo, scheduled to start at 4 p.m., will take over the hotel’s ballroom, boardrooms, foyer and lobby. Banco Popular will again serve as the corporate sponsor, with the Whittier Uptown Association and the Whittier Area Chamber of Commerce also sponsoring. The expo is free and open to the public. New this year is the Business Expo Booklet that will be available to all expo attendees. Sponsored and printed by ACRO Printing, Inc., the booklet will have contact information on all expo participants. As always, a variety of food will be available. Samples from many of Whittier’s restaurants and/or caterers will be showcased including Phlight Restaurant, Nancy’s Bakery, Starbucks, Cobblestone Caf , Olive Garden, Rocky Cola Caf , Crepes & Grapes Caf , Bon Appetit, Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, Orchard’s Fresh Foods, Sam’s Pizzeria and California Grill. For more information, call (562)698-9554. – From staff reportslast_img read more

Antelope Valley Calendar

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SUNDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will meet, 12:30 p.m. at Don Cuco Mexican Restaurant, 1106 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586 for reservations by Friday. Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with identification are admitted free. 40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30 p.m. Sunday at 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $7. Club membership: $20. Call (661) 718-8997. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with ID are admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 1 p.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 1/2 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Snyders Dance Groove will give ballroom, Latin, country and swing dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. For ages 40 and up. Cost: $3 per person. Call (661) 609-6510. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12 Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Recovery Inc., a self-help group for people with panic attacks, anxiety or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster, third floor. Call (661) 943-3956. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo at 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org TUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host its weekly league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group meets, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri at (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International rehearses, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. WEDNESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host a games social, 7 p.m. in Lancaster. Bring a snack to share and a beverage. Call (661) 267-2586 or (661) 946-5222. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call Alan Strech at (661) 940-4640. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. AIDS-related death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Sudden-death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Belly dancing classes, 7-9 p.m. at the Alpine Grange, 8650 E. Ave. T-8, Littlerock. Lessons: $2. Call (661) 944-1747. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 10 a.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org.last_img read more

Twitter Co-Founder @Ev: On to Startup #3

first_imgThe Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Related Posts Tags:#news#twitter#web If there was any room left for speculation left, let it be clear – Twitter co-founder Evan Williams has decided to further “scale back” his role at the company. Reports came out a month ago that the former CEO had been rather absent from the halls of the company’s headquarters in San Francisco and today Williams confirmed his lessening role. Why is Williams making the move? He says that Twitter is in “capable hands that aren’t [his]” and that he’s ready to move on to the next big thing.Williams stepped down from his position as CEO six months ago, handing the reigns over to Dick Costolo. He says that, upon stepping down, his “mind started to wander” and he realized that Twitter had reached the same state that Blogger had when he left it behind.When I took the CEO job, there were many who didn’t think Twitter would last this long. Today, even the naysayers have begrudgingly accepted it’s not disappearing anytime soon. I have the utmost confidence that, like Blogger, Twitter will grow an order of magnitude more (even though that’s a much taller order, given its size already). The momentum is just incredibly strong, critical mass has been reached, and the dark days of imminent technical meltdown are over.Of course, while those “days of imminent technical meltdown” may be over, the company has recently re-entered choppy waters in its efforts to monetize. Over recent months, the company has taken to a more stringent enforcement of its terms of service, causing developers to question how loyal it is to the ecosystem that helped it rise to its current status. Williams’ departure comes on the heels of the company’s declaration that perhaps developers should not focus any further effort on building clients, as it plans on moving in that direction, and recent, high-profile (though temporary) closures of several alternative clients. It also comes at the same time as fellow co-founder Jack Dorsey rejoins the company as a part-time director of product. What’s next for the two-time founder? Startup number three, of course, though Williams is tight-lipped on the details. He says that he will remain on Twitter’s board of directors and help any way he can, but that there are other problems to solve.“Now that Twitter is in capable hands that aren’t mine, it’s time to pick up a whiteboard marker and think fresh. There are other problems/opportunities in the world that need attention, and there are other individuals I’d love to get the opportunity to work with and learn from,” writes Williams. “While I doubt I’ll get so lucky a third time, as my good friend Biz Stone likes to say, ‘Creativity is a renewable resource.’ Let’s see what happens.” mike melansoncenter_img Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro…last_img read more

Indian Majority

first_imgTravel to Millbourne, Pa., the only town in America with a majority Indian population.It is a small, generic, unremarkable town, not unlike the thousands sprinkled across America. Yet this one has a characteristic remarkable in its unremarkability – every second person in the town is Indian! Walk down any street and start the count: one little Indian, two little Indian, three little Indian…. John Verghese:” My sister sponsored my wife as a nurse and we came to Millbourne in 1991. At that time in our street we had seven Indian families. Now we have two – thre Indian families but also three Sudanese families, another from Fiji and one from Vietnam.” Incredibly, the highest proportion of Indians per square feet is to be found not in Iselin, N.J., Queens, N.Y., or Freemont, Calif., which, incidentally, aren’t second, third or fourth, either (see chart). The highest concentration of Indians is to be found in Millbourne, Pennsylvania!In the 2000 Census, almost 40 percent of the population of 943 in this unpretentious borough was Indian, the highest in any place in the nation. The borough’s Indian population jumped 160 percent during the 1990s. Driven in part by a steady influx of Sikhs into the town since 9/11, according to Little India projections, Indians now constitute almost 63 percent of Millbourne’s current estimated population of 994, making it the first and only American town with an Indian majority. By contrast, the Indian population nationwide is under 0.6 percent and only 2 percent in New Jersey, the state with the highest proportion of Indians.The next densest Indian concentrations, in Plainsboro Center, N.J., and South Yuba City, Calif., are only about a fifth to a quarter of those towns’ populations, so Millbourne’s place in Indian American lore is likely secure for a few decades yet (See map). The “other” minority groups in the town are Whites at 21 percent and African American at 17 percent.  Superior Printing’s Imran Ahmed (left)and Roger Arya (right). Although Arya started out renting his office and home, he eventually bought the building. As business expanded, he acquired another building in the same block. He later purchased a one – family house a stone throw’s away, so he can now walk to work. Millbourne has been good to him.What brings Indian immigrants to this speck of a town in the state where the founding fathers first penned the American constitution and where the cornerstones of democracy were laid, but whose Indian population is actually below the national average?Millbourne is a blue-collar sort of town where modest dreams are dreamed about family, faith and community. It is a town fueled by faith, since many of the Indian immigrants moved to this neighborhood to be near their gurudwara, church or mosque.The 2000 Census outlines the broad contours of Millbourne’s Indian community. The gender breakdown is about even: 53 percent to 47 percent women. Five percent are mixed race. The median age of the Indian community is 32. Only 13 percent of the Indians are native-born. Almost two-thirds migrated to the United States within the previous decade. Like the other residents of the city, Indians in Millbourne are principally blue collar. The median household income for the 102 Indian households in the borough was $36,000, higher than the borough average, but substantially below the national median Indian household income of $64,000. However, only 7 percent of the Millbourne Indians were below the poverty line, as opposed to 9 percent of Indians nationally. Just 10 percent of Indians in the borough owned their home, which is less than a quarter of the home ownership rate among Indian Americans nationwide. Taken together, the statistical portrait that emerges of the Indians in Millbourne is one of the starting point of Indian American dreams. Raj Kumar Kapoor was attracted by the fact that the 69th Street Station is just two blocks away: “Millbourne is the next town to Centre City. We can hit downtown Philadelphia in ten minutes. It’s a good approach, because it’s a big terminal.” The parents – immigrants all – toil in neighboring towns as machinists, taxi drivers and nurses. All the while their children thrive and study, many aspiring to college and careers. Millbourne, however, never loses its blue-collar roots, because once the children discover their careers, they move. So do immigrants whose finances improve to the point that they can go on to bigger homes and bigger dreams in fancier suburbs.But Millbourne’s dreams never end; for just as someone’s dreams carries him away, another immigrant arrives, with battered suitcases and small dreams of just getting a foothold on the American Dream: a small corner in the universe to call their own, a piece of land that belongs to them.That might be an impossible dream in major metropolitan centers on the East Coast. In Millbourne it becomes surprisingly achievable.John R. Artmont, Millbourne’s fire chief, came to the borough at age 9 in 1951 and says his mother, now 83, still lives in the house where he grew up, Artmont, who is Italian, is the oldest member of the Fire Department and remembers a very different town with a largely Caucasian population.“I can remember back in the ’50s we had everybody, there was no population density of any one particular ethnicity,” he says. “Then the Greek community came here because of the church in Upper Darby and the community was very oriented toward the church – all the people congregated there. Later they migrated to the Broomall area and built a church there. Now we have the Indian community that moved in, basically because of the gurudwara in Millbourne.”On the streets you won’t encounter many white faces. Instead one is far more likely to encounter Indians, African American, Jamaican, or other South Asians. Dilbaugh Kaur Randhawa, who may have remained a housewife if she had stayed in Jullundur, enjoys her job and America. She says with a smile about Millbourne, “Sab kuch milta hai idhar” Millbourne is so tiny that you can walk around its dozen or so blocks. It is bounded on one side by the train line. On one side of its main road – Market Street – sits another town, Upper Darby, an 81,000 “megalopolis” by comparison, to which it is symbiotically linked. Most residents don’t know or care which is which. Millbourne’s children attend Upper Darby schools, because the borough has none of its own and many businesses on Market Street fall on the Upper Darby side. It’s possible to pick up your green chilies in J&J Grocery in Millbourne, then hop across the street to buy your onions in Upper Darby’s Subzi Mandi. Philadelphia is just a 10-minute, 5-mile drive or train ride away.It is a gritty kind of town, with no fancy frills. You won’t find any trendy Starbucks here, nor hip Gap stores. Plenty of McDonalds, auto shops and laundromats dot the landscape and on Millbourne’s sunbaked streets one is likely to encounter many small mom and pop stores – groceries, video shops, gas stations and halal shops. Indian businesses include an assortment of printing, fashion, travel, insurance, accounting and law offices, as well as the ubiquitous grocery stores.Millbourne does not boast a movie theater or fancy restaurants (not even an Indian dive), but it has a gurudwara, a Keralite church and a small mosque – all within the 0.1 sq mile oval shaped borough. The town’s borough manager Dru Ann Staud said, “We do not have it broken down as a percentage as to what ethnic groups are here, but I know it’s very diverse.” The borough council, comprising Mayor William Donovan and five councilmen, meets every third Monday of the month. The town’s tax collector Archana Arya is Indian.“We have people from doctors to pharmacists to taxi drivers to blue collar workers like plumbers, electricians and contractors,” says Staud. “It’s a wide variety of positions. A lot of people start out here, they may rent a home and then they build up, and then they purchase a home either in Millbourne or elsewhere.” Narinder Singh recalls the attraction of small houses that people could rent in the Millbourne area over the apartments they had lived in: “It was such a peaceful place and in those days the 69th Street Market wa the biggest market of the area. People used to come from all the surrounding areas to it. There wee big stores here. It is said about Millbourne, it was so safe that people never used to loch their houses. Never” The pulse and heart of Millbourne are the hundreds of small row houses behind the main street, the place where hard-working immigrants return at night to rest their heads on their pillows. These are the homes were families are reared, favorite meals are cooked and dreams are nurtured, all within a budget.The earliest Indian immigrants to settle here were nurses from Kerala, who had been sponsored for jobs at area hospitals. Soon their husbands and children followed, establishing themselves in this small, very affordable town.“This is true for majority of the cases where the wives first came to the country as nurses,” says John Kurichi, whose family was among the first Keralite family to settle in Millbourne in 1979; his wife has been a nurse for 27 years. He believes his was the first Indian family to move into the area; many other families with links to Kerala followed. The families are members of the Malayalee Association of Delaware and the community keeps connected through the St. Gregorios Malan Kara Orthodox Church, which has a pastor from Kerala.Kurichi recalls of those early days, “It was a pretty place with trees and greenery. The transportation was good to the metropolitan area and the school district was good. There is a police station and police patrolled all the time so people felt safe.”One of the biggest attractions was the affordable housing: Kurichi, who was working as a guidance counselor in the Philadelphia school system, bought a four bedroom house with a living room, dining room, kitchen, baths and full basement for just $33,000.J & J Groceries is one of the first Indian grocery store established in the area and though larger ones, like Sabzi Mandi across the street in Upper Darby, have since muscled in, it retains its loyal customer base, especially Keralites. The store carries produce from Kerala, by companies such as Periyar and Classic, which many other Indian grocery stores don’t stock. It has products targeted at other communities as well. Gurmail Singh recalls: “I didn’t have a car in those days and the rent I was paying for a one bedroom was $500. The mortgage for a home in those days  was just $600 so I decided to move to Millbourne and bought a three-bedroom house in 1986. The mortgage worked out to just $600. I had no car and the train brought me right to my house.” Walk into this small store and you see the sense of accommodation: unlike Indian grocery stores in New York or California, which publicize themselves as Indo Pak groceries, this one has a wider audience, billing itself as American, Indian, Bangladeshi and Jamaican groceries.“There has to be a supply and demand,” says John Varghese, the owner, between ringing up sales at the register. His sister, a nurse, has been in New Jersey since 1976, and she in turn was sponsored by her elder sister, also a nurse. He recalls, “My sister sponsored my wife as a nurse and we came to Millbourne in 1991. At that time in our street we had seven Indian families. Now we have two-three Indian families, but also three Sudanese families, another from Fiji and one from Vietnam.”The Keralite community, aside from its church in Millbourne, also has an active Malayalee organization, which advertises prominently on the door of J & J Groceries. Why did so many Malayalee families zero in on Millbourne? Varghese says, “The same way we came, so many people came, some in 1972, some in 1975. Most of them were nurses or medical workers.” Several first came alone to work, but were later joined by spouses who found work in offices or factories, depending on their qualifications.Even within the tiny confines of Market Street, it is possible to have a diversified business and expand into different fields. Roger Arya of Superior Printing earlier lived in Downingtown, west of Philadelphia, 35 miles away. He bought his existing store on Market Street and later moved to the area.“The market was changing and there was a lot of competition, so we decided to go into different fields.” In 2000 he started Superior Medical Supplies, specializing in incontinence products, which he supplies to nursing and retirement homes in the area. He’s also started an employment agency called Superior Nursing Care, which supplies nurses to various hospitals.Although Arya started out renting his office and home, he eventually bought the building. As business expanded, he acquired another building in the same block. He later purchased a one-family house a stone’s throw away, so he can now walk to work. Millbourne has been good to him. Jyoti Cuisine India, which manufactures Indian meals in Sharon Hill, as well as canned goods and ready to eat entrees that are sold in natural food stores and currently provides the hot meals served on board Continental, British Airways, Emirates and US Airway flights. Their automated facilities require only 15 workers, but ten of them are Sikh women from Millbourne, who catch the bus daily to the plant. And the entrepreneurs keep coming. At the K Video & Grocery, the shop was being stocked by a young couple who had rented it only three weeks earlier. As Hindi film music blared on a CD, Raj Kumar Kapoor sorted spices and placed them on racks. His wife Simmi stacked videos and rang the cash register.Migrants from New Jersey, they are chasing a dream that the burgeoning Indian population in Millbourne can support yet another grocery store. Already there are eight grocery and video outlets and even a jewelry store in the vicinity.Kapoor’s store sits in Millbourne and he lives in Upper Darby, where his children go to school. He was attracted by the fact that the 69th Street Station is just two blocks away: “Millbourne is the next town to Center City. We can hit downtown Philadelphia in ten minutes. It’s a good approach, because it’s a big terminal.”The trains are the lifeblood of a community, moving people to jobs and giving them the flexibility to work further away. Philadelphia is where many of the jobs are to be found. It also has the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University, as well as several Indian-owned stores in North East Philadelphia, almost a dozen Indian restaurants and several grocery stores. Millbourne offers good, cheap housing and transport for many of their workers.The predominant subethnic group in Millbourne is, without a doubt, Sikh, accounting for, according to some, as much as 80 percent of the Indian population. It is home to the Sikh Gurudwara and the Philadelphia Sikh Society, which is the nucleus and the reason for the expanding community. Mary Kutty and her husband Sunny Thomas, who is in printing, work in New Jersey, but come home to Millbourne to a life reminiscent of that in India. Erin Court, a block of two family houses, stands on a bluff overlooking a picturesque forestscape. The lines of small, unassuming row houses face each other with green lawns in between and a small path running within it. All the homes have Indian tenants, originally from Punjab and Kerala,. Neighbourhood children scurry about from home to home. Millbourne experienced a population surge from New York after 9/11. Many Sikh families abandoned New York in the wake of the terror attacks and racial profiling and took refuge in this small community where the gurudwara was their beacon and anchor, and all around them were people of their color and beliefs.For the Sikhs in the Philadelphia area, Millbourne is important because the only two gurudwaras are in the vicinity. The older, smaller one is in Upper Darby, while the new, larger one is built in what was a former unemployment office in Millbourne.Faith is an exceedingly important force within the Sikh community. As Dilbaugh Kaur Randhawa, a devotee at the gurudwara, put it succinctly, “We followed our Golden Temple.”With the holy Guru Granth Saheb on the premises and regular prayer sessions, for many, it’s as if they never left home for here they have their faith and their community. On a recent weekend, almost a dozen women were busy in the gurudwara kitchen performing seva – cooking up pots and pots of daal, vegetables and hot rotis, which they slathered with butter, to be served as langar after the devotions.Randhawa left Jullunder, Punjab, 21 years ago and started life in Millbourne. She then spent 13 years in Philadelphia where she works at a university, cleaning the computer rooms and labs. Her son works at the airport in maintenance and her husband handles properties. Their daughter, after a college education, is a teacher in China.Three years ago, the family returned to Millbourne because of the gurudwara. The family includes Randhawa’s 90-year-old mother-in-law whose life revolves around the gurudwara. Randhawa, who may have remained a housewife if she had stayed in Jullunder, enjoys her job and America. As she says with a smile, “Sab kuch milta hai idhar.” (Everything is available here.) Chandan Kumar, ninety, whose life revolves around the gurudwara, is one of Millbourne’s seniormost citizen. On a recent Saturday afternoon, the children of the community sat in a line in the hall and ate the langar, then the parents trickled in. Sunday is an even bigger celebration. As many as 500 to 600 people turn up from towns as far away as King of Prussia. It’s the only gurudwara for Philadelphia and so is the life source of the community.Over steaming cups of chai, some of the members of gurudwara filled in a reporter on their life in Millbourne. Narinder Singh, chairman of its board of trustees, came from Punjab in 1982 to California and then to Millbourne in 1987. There were just seven or eight families there. “I’m a machinist at a factory. There were many steel factories in the surrounding area where parts are made.”He recalls the attraction of small houses that people could rent in the Millbourne area over the apartments they had lived in: “It was such a peaceful place and in those days the 69th Street Market was the biggest market of the area. People used to come from all the surrounding areas to it. There were big stores here. It is said about Millbourne, it was so safe that people never used to lock their houses. Never.” The possibility of owning one’s own home was seductive. Gurmail Singh, who owns Tandoor Restaurant in Philadelphia, came from India in 1978. “We moved to the city in 1986. At that time there were only four families. There was no one else here and there were no Indians in Millbourne, which we used to consider a part of Upper Darby. Then some more families moved in and they bought homes in Millbourne and it was then that we realized that Millbourne is a separate borough.”At the time, Gurmail worked at a restaurant in Philadelphia, but lived in Upper Darby. “I didn’t have a car in those days,” he recalls, “And the rent I was paying for a one bedroom apartment was $500. The mortgage for a home in those days was just $600 so I decided to move to Millbourne and bought a three-bedroom house in 1986. I had no car and the train brought me right to my home.” Balwinder Singh, priest of the Sikh Gurudwara and Philadelphia Sikh Society, Millbourne, experienced a population surge frm New York after 9/11. Many Sikh families abandoned New York in the wake of the terror attacks and racial profiling and took refuge in this small community where the gurudwra was their beacon and anchor, and all around them were people of their color and beliefs. The parents may not be all college educated, but the higher education of their children is an aspiration for all of them. Many of the children worked part-time to pay for college, explained Harbir Singh: “Some of our children have gone to college. We’ve just been here 14 years. One is an engineer at Lockheed and another is an electric engineer with a $55,000 salary. Others are studying medicine.” The children of some truckers or cab drivers have stuck with the family profession.“I came on the strength of this friend who is like a brother to me. Seeing me, others came,” remembers Narinder Singh. “When others asked for recommendations, I would tell them this is a peaceful area. Come! It’s a safe area, the police are well equipped and there’s law and order. Jobs are available in the surrounding area. Crime rate is microscopic. Seeing this, we being social animals, we followed each other, knowing that if we needed support, we would have our people close by. Looking at each other, we kept coming.”Currently, nearly 800 Indian families call Millbourne and the Upper Darby area home. Upper Darby recorded 2,082 Indians in the 2000 Census, almost four times the Indian population of Millbourne, but just 2 percent of the city’s population. Even though Indians are a majority in Millbourne, Harbir Singh, secretary of the gurudwara, laments, “But many don’t have the vote and that’s the problem. Many of them are not citizens and are not empowered to vote.”The gurudwara started in 1990 with just seven to eight families meeting in each other’s homes for kirtan. In 1994 they secured a space in Upper Darby to start a gurudwara and held programs on alternate Sundays, then every Sunday. Soon so many more had moved into the area that in 1997, they acquired the space for the Millbourne gurudwara. With the holy Guru Granth Saheb on the premises and regular prayer sessions, for many, it’s as if they never left home for here they have their faith and their community. On a recent weekend, almost a dozen women were busy in the gurudwara kitchen performing seva – cooking up pots and pots of daal, vegetables and hot rotis, which they slathered with butter, to be served as langar after the devotions. Many Millbourne Indians run small businesses, own taxis or work blue collar jobs in the area. Several women work in textile factories, in the packing department of QVC, which has a big warehouse in the neighboring area, and a mailing outlet. Others work in the post office and banks.Some four miles away is Jyoti Cuisine India, which manufactures Indian meals in Sharon Hill, as well as canned goods and ready to eat entrees that are sold in natural food stores like Whole Foods. The company has been producing natural vegetarian food since 1979 and currently provides the hot meals served on board Continental, British Airways, Emirates and US Airway flights. Their automated facilities require only 15 workers, but ten of them are Sikh women from Millbourne, who catch the bus daily to the plant.According to Sunil Manchanda, business manager at Jyoti Foods: “Ours is basically Indian food and these women know what Indian food is all about. Some work on the cooking, making matri or gulab jamun or parathas and rotis for the airlines. Another set of women work on the plating. Each plate has three components: vegetables, rice and beans. They know how to handle these foods.”It’s intriguing to see the links little Millbourne has with the outside world – passengers in international carriers high up in the sky, continents away, are eating meals cooked and packed by women of the Indian community of the town. The pulse and heart of Millbourne are the hundreds of small row houses behind the main street, the place where hard -working immigrants return at night to rest their hads on their pillows. These are the homes where families are reared, favorite meals are cooked and dreams are nurtured, all within a budget. Millbourne has seen steady migration from New York, especially after 9/11. Sikh cab drivers found they were able to afford only a taxi medallion in New York, but the economics of Millbourne allow them to have both – a home of their own and a medallion – which explains the allure of this small borough. The cab drivers own their own medallions and work in Philadelphia, returning at night to their homes in Millbourne.“They are able to buy both and still have money to put away in savings,” says Narinder Singh. “I was a machinist, but after my company moved to South Carolina, I couldn’t get a job in any other factory for a full year. So then to bring home some money, I started driving a taxi. Later I bought a medallion, but now I again have a job in a factory. Now I’ve leased the taxi.”Amar Deep Singh used to live in New York and worked in the construction sector. Now he operates his own construction business, which is doing well. Why did he leave New York? “It’s a very fast city. There’s lots of money to be made. There’s no shortage of work, but there’s no life,” he says. “It’s a run for money. There’s no life there.”In Millbourne and neighboring Upper Darby he can find a community of people who know each other and neighbors within walking distance. The fabric of life is maintained and even though they have left their homeland, the loss isn’t so painful, because they really haven’t lost the community and caring.As family finances improve, many move on to bigger homes in surrounding towns. Gurmail Singh moved to Havertown, about four miles away. But they all return, if not for good, at least for the day, because the Gurudwara is so vital to their lives. Ninan J Poovathoor (right), John Cherian (center) and Jaison George (left) on Millbourne Avenue. The moon will still shine over Millbourne, just over a new set of dreams and dreamers. For this little borouigh seems to have a magic spell woven around it. The new arrivals find there’s always room at the inn and a place at the table. As the men sat on the carpeted room of the Gurudwara, their heads covered, sipping milky tea, you could see why this sacred spot had made Millbourne an important part of their lives. They could travel far, but its holy center would always tug them back.The Sikh community is now integral also to the borough of Millbourne and, according to Harbir Singh, they have experienced no racial tensions: “So far we don’t have any problems. After 9/11, when there were some attacks on cab drivers, the mayor spoke in our favor. We have good relations with the mayor and borough head, everyone has helped us.”Only a third of the Indian residents of Millbourne are citizens, so their population numbers notwithstanding, they have little political clout. An Indian American, Kurian Mathai, is reportedly vying for mayor, and earlier another Indian, Gurnam Singh, had served as vice president of the borough council. Currently, however, no Indian is on the five-member borough council.The Sikhs especially have been active in the local community. According to Staud, members have participated in community activities: “They are very helpful and want to be a part of the town. They come down for council meetings and different activities, help with distributing flyers and interacting whenever there is a language barrier. On Safety Day they put out a table with Indian food so neighbors could taste it. It was very good public relations, because people got to talk to each other outside their business hours.” Asked if in all his years in the town, Artmont had seen any friction between the races, the Fire Chief responded, “I haven’t seen any of that. The only thing I see is a problem with the language barrier, because there are so many people with different backgrounds, ethnicities and languages.” Incongruous as it mat seem at first blush, the Keralite church, the Sikh gurdwara, the mosque and the Indian children darting in and out of row homes on street after lined street are a quintessentially American story. Millbourne may be pretty small, but it’s densely populated – 1,000 people packed in 0.07 sq miles of space. On one side are apartments, and at the other end are older, bigger four bedrooms homes, built around 1898 in the borough that was founded in 1722. Some of the bigger houses have been turned into apartments in which several families live.Yet it is so much more than a bedroom community – it is home, it is land they can call their own. It’s still possible to get a three-bedroom house with a patch of green for under $100,000. When residents moved here in the 1960’s and 1970’s, with their down payment the monthly mortgage amount was just $500 – what they might pay for rent elsewhere.Even today Mary Kutty Thomas knows how far dreams can go in Millbourne. Thomas was a pharmacist in Kerala before she and her husband came to the United States, sponsored by his sister. Millbourne is about links, about family connections, one joining the next, joining the next. It’s about the power of word of mouth.Mary Kutty and her husband Sunny Thomas, who is in printing, work in New Jersey, but come home to Millbourne to a life reminiscent of that in India. Erin Court, a block of two family houses, stands on a bluff overlooking a picturesque forestscape. The lines of small, unassuming row houses face each other with green lawns in between and a small path running within it. All the homes have Indian tenants, originally from Punjab and Kerala. Neighborhood children scurry about from home to home.The Thomases’ landlord is also from Kerala, as are their neighbors in the two family house rising on the patch of green. The $500 rent affords them a two-bedroom home with a nice living room. They also have the luxury of a finished basement shared with other tenants in the two-family home. The two families pitched in to buy a washer and dryer for the basement and use the facilities on alternate days. The parents –  immigrants all- toil in neighboring towns as machinists, taxi- drivers and nurses. All the while their children thrive and study, many aspiring to colleges and careers.In their basement one sees a colorful assortment of laundry on the clothesline and plenty of toys and children’s bikes underfoot. Space, usually a luxury in cramped rented apartments, is possible in Millbourne. For $500, they would have been lucky to get just a basement in New York.Transport, cheap rents and Indian groceries – what more could any desi want? And the dreamers and the strugglers keep coming. To look at Millbourne is to see the American Dream in motion, in black and white. The basics – a roof over one’s head, a yard for the kids and educational opportunities. And friends and community close by.Millbourne is their starting point, a place where stories begin. Often it leads them on to bigger and better places. But it is beautiful and wholesome even if life keeps them there.It is a story that can get only better with telling. Both Staud and Artmont mentioned several projects in the works that have the potential to change the face of the town and impact the lives of its population. There is the Market Street Gateway Project to revitalize the business district to attract more businesses and encourage residents to shop locally rather than in surrounding towns or in Philadelphia. The 69th Street Terminal is a hub of the SEPTA transit line and a brand new station is being planned for the Millbourne stop, with an elevator to improve accessibility.Currently businesses are concentrated on Market Street. A 14-acre old Sears property – almost a third of the whole town – is being developed. Says Artmont, “We are going to make it retail down there and bring our tax base back.”One wonders, 10 years down the line, what will Millbourne look like? Will it be gentrified or will it still be a meat and potatoes – or rather dal-bhat – kind of town? Who will be living in its homes, rushing to the 69th Street Station? After realizing the dreams of its current residents, the town will no doubt be putting the shine on the hopes and aspirations of the next batch of immigrants. The parents may not all be college educated, but the higher education of their children is an aspiration for all of them. Many of the children worked part-time to pay for college. We’ve just been here for 14 years. One is an engineer at Lockheed and another is an electric engineer with a $55,000 salary. Others are studying medicine.” The moon will still shine over Millbourne, just over a new set of dreams and dreamers. For this little borough seems to have a magic spell woven around it. The new arrivals find there’s always room at the inn and a place at the table.It’s an article of faith in America that small towns across the hinterland thrive on the core values of family and church. Incongruous as it might seem at first blush, the Keralite church, the Sikh gurudwara, the mosque and the Indian children darting in and out of row homes on street after lined street are a quintessentially American story. Profile of Indian Population in MillbourneMillbourneUnited StatesPopulation of Area Total40%0.60%Male53%53%Female47%47%Median Age (Years)3032Household Size3.13.1Native Born13%25%Naturalized Citizen18%30%Not a Citizen68%44%Pre 1990 Immigrant47%78%Post 1990 Immigrant53%22%Median Household Income$36,000$63,669People in Poverty7%10%Data is for Indians in Millbourne and in the United States.Source: 2000 Census Related Itemslast_img read more

D-Backs D-Stroy Yankees, 12-2

first_imgPHOENIX — The Arizona offense finally came alive, and Jake Lamb led the way.The young third baseman broke open the game with a three-run home run and the Diamondbacks snapped a five-game losing streak with a 12-2 rout of the New York Yankees on May 16.Lamb was a triple shy of the cycle, and Arizona had 15 hits after scoring just six runs in losing four straight at home to San Francisco.“People say it a lot but I think that hitting is a little contagious,” Lamb said. “Just to get a game like this, it’s kind of like you can take a deep breath and go, ‘OK, we can hit.’”Paul Goldschmidt, 1 for 14 in the Giants series, also homered off Chad Green (0-1) in the right-hander’s major league debut. The Diamondbacks had lost seven straight at home.Robbie Ray (2-2) allowed two runs on six hits in seven innings, his longest outing of the season, and got his first career RBI.“That’s as good as I’ve ever seen him,” Arizona Manager Chip Hale said, “in the strike zone, going after guys. He was using his breaking ball, his changeup, but he was really beating them with his fastball. I could hear him grunting out there.”Jacoby Ellsbury tripled and scored for the Yankees, who began a seven-game trip after a 7-3 homestand.“There is never a good time to have a game like this,” Yankees Manager Joe Girardi said. “I wasn’t sure what we were going to get from Greenie. I thought he did a decent job.”Green went four innings plus two batters, giving up six runs — four earned — on eight hits.“It was an awesome experience but I left some balls up in the zone and they did some damage with it,” he said. “Overall I made a couple of mistakes I am not happy with. It was OK.”First baseman Mark Teixeira dropped the throw from Green on Michael Bourn’s bunt for an error that began Arizona’s five-run fifth.Goldschmidt walked and, in an eight-pitch at-bat, Lamb hit one over the swimming pool beyond the right field fence for his fifth homer of the season.“Especially in that situation, a guy on second, I was trying to get a base hit,” Lamb said. “Just because we’ve been struggling a little bit, you don’t want to do too much in that situation. I got the barrel on it and the ball flew.”New York tied it 2-2 when Ellsbury tripled to start the fifth and scored when shortstop Nick Ahmed’s relay throw careened off Ellsbury’s helmet and into the stands.The Yankees scored a run on three straight hits to start the fourth and could have had more but Bourn, who joined the Diamondbacks on May 15, made a leaping grab of Aaron Hicks’ drive at the wall in center. The inning ended when Green struck out with the bases loaded.Green never batted in his minor league career.(BOB BAUM, AP Sports Writer)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

Smart connectivity solutions enable seamless and immersive AR/VR experiences

first_img December 19, 2017 at 8:06 am Suppose you are the technical lead for a new, cutting-edge project at your company. The vision is clear, the idea is validated, and your schedule looks good, but there are two key components you need to connect together. The problem is that they have different I/O interfaces that can’t communicate with each other. As a result, schedules are delayed, deadlines are missed, and significant resources have to be diverted to make these components work together, resulting in cost overruns and a lot of headaches.Unfortunately, this is an all too common problem for engineers working on cutting-edge technologies. When you are inventing the latest and greatest product, the last thing you want to do is be held up, slowed down, or fail completely because your components don’t work together.The consumer electronics market is constantly evolving, with entirely new categories of devices being regularly created. The last decade alone has seen the introduction of the smartphone, tablet, and eBook, and this trend is set to continue. Today’s latest trends are represented by the sudden emergence of Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) segments. In particular, the Head Mounted Display (HMD) has sparked high interest and participation from a broad range of companies, including traditional hardware manufacturers and social networking companies.In the battle to win these hypercompetitive new markets, the requirements for size, speed, cost, power consumption, and time-to-market are constantly being pushed. Tools that help bridge different standards and protocols to connect disparate components together free engineers to select the best components for the task at hand, rather than letting interfaces drive design.The consumer electronics market is constantly innovating, with entire new categories of devices being regularly created (Source: Lattice Semiconductor) Many technologies have to come together to successfully create a compelling VR/AR experience. From a hardware perspective, much of the innovation in the VR space happens in the Head Mounted Display and controllers, which a user wears to experience VR. Advances in high performance, low power FPGAs and ASSPs bring a much-needed degree of design flexibility, with significant savings in time, cost, and resources over developing purpose-built chips for each permutation in this developing space. These benefits apply to several areas of the VR/AR experience including sensors, video display, and connectivity.Virtual Reality (VR) As its name suggests, virtual reality tries to replace your perception of reality with a manufactured one. To do this, VR primarily targets a user’s vision and hearing (tactile feedback is also an emerging area of development). For VR to be immersive, the experience must target the senses effectively. Therefore, a helmet or sealed goggles paired with earphones are typically used. These devices are commonly called Head Mounted Displays, or HMDs.Despite their name, HMDs are not only displays; they also contain large numbers of sophisticated sensors. Most of the VR hardware technology development centers around these devices, and there are various types depending on which processor or device is driving the HMD and how the HMD is being powered. A brief summary of the different HMD types is as follows:PC/Console Tethered: With a PC/console tethered display, the HMD essentially acts as a monitor replacement, with the PC/console providing all of the processing power. Examples include the Oculus Rift, the HTC Vive, and the Sony Playstation VR.Mobile VR Headset: In the case of a mobile VR headset, a smartphone is inserted into the headset to act as the display and processing engine. The controller is either built into the unit or is shipped with the headset. The mobile headset, because of its cost, simplicity and promotion, is currently the most popular VR HMD. The Samsung Gear VR and Google’s DayDream View are two examples of mobile VR headsets.Mobile AIO (All-In-One): With a mobile AIO headset, the HMD has an integrated processor, display, and battery, making it an all-in-one standalone VR device. Since it is battery-powered and has an onboard processor, it does not need to be tethered to any other device. An example of this HMD type is the Deepoon AIO VR. Many companies are showing prototypes such as the Oculus’ Santa Cruz product and Intel’s Project Alloy.Mobile Tethered: In the case of a phone-tethered HMD, both processing and power are provided by a mobile phone, driving a display in the HMD. An example of this type of device is the LG 360 VR, which connects over USB Type-C.PC Untethered: While PC/Console-based HMDs currently offer the best VR experience because of higher performance, the cabling is a nuisance, if not a safety hazard. Mobile HMDs free the user from the cable, but their processors’ limited performance demotes the content to simple games and casual 360 videos. TPCAST, a vendor from Beijing, China, announced a wireless upgrade kit for the HTC Vive providing the best of the both worlds. Requiring low latency, high bandwidth wireless video transmission, TPCAST’s video solution consists of various FPGAs and ASSPs from Lattice for offering near-zero latency and robust non-line of sight (NLOS) performance and support for wireless transmission of VR display resolution at 2160 x 1200 and at 90Hz.The variety of Head Mounted Display types illustrates one of the challenges of a new market. Many models are being attempted and industry best practices are still being determined. The flexibility of FPGAs is critical to the success of these evolving hardware markets. In the VR/AR space specifically, FPGAs have proven essential in the areas of sensor aggregation, video display bridging, and connectivity.Gesture and positional tracking sensors One of the biggest problems in creating a VR experience is vertigo. A lifetime of real-world interaction has turned our bodies into finely tuned reality detectors. Vertigo occurs when those expectations are challenged. Standing on a glass bridge and looking down is a good example, because your sense of touch and balance is telling you there is solid ground under you, but your sense of sight is telling you there is nothing there.Since VR is trying to create an alternate reality for the user, any delay or mismatch between the user’s movements and the virtual projection can contribute to a sense of “VR vertigo.” Due to this, VR engines need to quickly and accurately locate the user’s head movements and send that data back to the processor to generate the appropriate video. A variety of gesture and positional tracking sensors are used to track head, hand, and body movements. Each solution has tradeoffs in portability, accuracy, and cost that have to be considered as follows:Accelerometers: The simplest way to track movement is with accelerometers. These can be embedded into the HMD, similar to the technology in mobile phones today. This system is cheap, but not accurate enough to create a truly compelling VR experience.Infrared Sensors: Infrared sensors detect pulses from wall mounted lasers, either directly or that bounce off reflective dots on the user’s body, controller, or HMD. The HTC Vive, which uses Valve StreamVR 3D tracking, is an example of such a sensor array tracking system. This system is significantly more accurate than accelerometers, but can only track where there is a sensor or dot. This generally limits tracking to the HMD and the controller held by the user.Multi-Camera Rigs: These are “Kinect” or “Leap Motion”-type stereo or multi-camera arrays that are constantly capturing the user’s position. A Kinect-type system is designed to capture the full body, while a Leap Motion-type device is designed to capture a user’s gestures. The advantage of camera sensor arrays is that they can track the full body without a custom motion capture suit or reflective dots. However, these systems require significantly more bandwidth and processing horsepower to analyze the data.Some use cases are as follows:Concurrent sensor sampling: To accurately track motion with precision, a sensor array is often needed. Most MCUs, however, do not have enough I/Os and lacks the architecture to provide concurrent data capture. On the other hand, FPGAs such as Lattice’s iCE40 family are optimized for low power, small form factor and low cost operation. In addition to concurrent data capture, designers can decide if they want to perform spatial processing directly in the FPGA (which may require a larger FPGA), or have the FPGA time stamp captured data to enable MCU for further processing.Multi Camera sampling: These systems produce significantly more data than an accelerometer or FPGA-based system. A more powerful FPGA, such as the new CrossLink™ programmable ASSP (pASSP) device, is good for aggregating the data of multiple cameras. For visual-based tracking, pASSPs can interface with multiple cameras, and concurrently sample and aggregate multiple video streams to enable video processors that have limited or incompatible camera interface.Gesture Tracking: In some use cases, a more integrated gesture tracking solution is needed. High performance and low power FPGAs are ideal for aggregating multiple cameras and implementing low latency gesture tracking algorithms, such as chroma extraction, depth mapping, and spatial calculation.An array of sensors is used to track head position and movement in order to create a flawless experience for the user (Source: Lattice Semiconductor) Gesture tracking with iCE40 Concurrent Sensor Hub (Source: Lattice Semiconductor) Video Display In VR/AR, the standard models for displaying content on a screen have been upended and new methods are constantly being tested to deliver the most realistic experience. High resolution and low latency are always desirable traits, but when your display screens are 2-3 inches in size and sitting just a couple of inches away from the user’s eyes, high resolution becomes critical. Also, high refresh rates and low latency are essential for combating VR vertigo. If a user turns his/her head and there is a lag before the video reflects that movement, the body registers that discrepancy and is confused. Lowering latency and increasing refresh rates helps integrate the virtual experience so that positional data on head movements can be reflected in the video a user sees instantly, without any jerkiness or stuttering.At the core of creating a realistic VR experience is the ability to display different images to each eye to create the illusion of 3D. Display bridging in VR often involves taking a single video stream and extracting the video for each eye, or conversely, taking the data from two cameras and combining them into a single stream.Some use cases are as follows:Left/Right Video: Mobile application processors (APs) are often used in VR headsets. Some legacy application processors are limited to a single MIPI DSI output. In order to drive separate left eye / right eye displays, a single MIPI DSI output from the AP can be input into an FPGA video bridge, which then splits the video for each display.Non-Mobile Display/Micro-Displays: As the VR/AR market is still in its infancy, vendors are actively searching for the optimal display solution. Some AR systems may use high-pixel-per-inch ELV (electronic viewfinder) microdisplays that are developed for high-end DSLR cameras. These displays often use interfaces such as RGB or LVDS, which are not compatible with the MIPI DSI found on most application processors. An FPGA video bridge, such as CrossLink, can connect the two incompatible interfaces.External Input Bridging: Most application processors being utilized in VR space lack the interface to input common external video sources, such as HDMI. In these situations, a video bridge can convert one of these popular inputs to MIPI CSI-2.Camera Output: The increased demand for content has sparked the popularity of 360-degree image and video solutions, moving from proprietary professional equipment to low-cost accessories for mobile phones. This promises to provide an explosion of content in which VR users can immerse themselves. Existing application processors may not have enough MIPI CSI-2 inputs or the right interfaces to support the multiple cameras needed in this application.Programmable application-specific standard product (pASSP) video bridges can help to merge MIPI CSI-2 streams from multiple cameras into a single MIPI CSI-2 stream to be input into the application processor.The same pASSP video bridges can also convert from other camera interfaces including LVDS, SLVS, RGB to MIPI CSI-2. Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: Analog, Coprocessors, Digital Continue Reading Previous CPU plus FPGA design flow for software developers: A new tangible realityNext Dialing in to ESC Minneapolis 2017 “AR technologies are one of the most fruitful ways for business development and increasing revenues. There are many real-world examples of how AR is currently being deployed in a commercial setting, from museums and theme parks, to astronomy and fashion. T 1 thought on “Smart connectivity solutions enable seamless and immersive AR/VR experiences” center_img alexblack says: Augmented reality/specialty HMD (Source: Lattice Semiconductor) Connectivity Many VR displays are connected to an external device. Today, the processing power of a PC is still required to create a truly immersive experience. Typically, video connections such as HDMI are appropriate for this task as they support high audio/video bandwidth at very low latency and over a long cable (3-5 meters). However, in some cases, particularly for mobile devices, a connection over USB Type-C, which carries video, data, and power can also be quite convenient.Going forward, wireless video offers a compelling alternative to the existing market. Without cables, the user has more freedom to move, which can significantly enhance the VR experience.Some use cases are as follows:Video Connectivity: HDMI is the default video-only connection in VR space. Its speed, high bandwidth, ultra-low latency, and broad market acceptance makes it an ideal choice.Video + Data + Power: While HDMI is the most common video connectivity option, the standard HDMI cable can be bulky. The HMD often requires power and may also have sensor data that needs to be sent back to the main processing unit. In these cases, USB Type-C solutions that support MHL or DisplayPort to provide video, data, and power in one thin, flexible cable may be appropriate.Wireless: Paired with a battery-powered HMD, wireless video allows the greatest freedom of movement for the user. WirelessHD is a compelling technology in this case, providing high-speed digital video at HDMI bandwidths and latencies. For example, the TPCAST Wireless VR accessory for the HTC Vive uses WirelessHD technology.Conclusion Time and time again, FPGAs have proven to be an essential part of product development in fast evolving new markets. As manufacturers race to stake their ground in VR space, high-performance, low-power FPGAs and ASSPs play a key role in developing and connecting parts of the VR toolkit, aggregating and analyzing sensor data, seamlessly displaying 3D video, and connecting the HMD and the computer. As the VR market continues to develop and mature, FPGAs will continue to have a role to play in ensuring that designers have the flexibility they need to create the best possible VR experience for the users.Ying Jen Chen is the Senior Business Development Manager at Lattice Semiconductor focusing on emerging consumer applications such as VR/AR, drone and Consumer IoT. Mr. Chen has 18 years of experience in the FPGA industry. Prior to Lattice, he managed the China and Taiwan channel sales for Altera, focusing on market segments ranging from networking and computing to industrial and consumer. Mr. Chen held both technical and business roles during his 15-year tenure at Altera in the U.S. and Taiwan. He received his Bachelor’s degrees in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science (EECS) and Materials Sciences & Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Log in to Reply Leave a Reply Cancel reply You must Register or Login to post a comment. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.last_img read more

All you need to now ahead of VAR at the World Cup

first_imgWorld Cup New World Cup rules: How will VAR & in-game retrospective punishment work? Cady Siregar 07:27 6/9/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) World Cup trophy Getty Images World Cup This summer marks the first instance in which video assistant refereeing will be used at a World Cup, and Goal rounds up all you need to know about it FIFA are set to implement VAR (video assistant refereeing) for the first time at a World Cup this summer in Russia after it has already been rolled out in multiple professional leagues, including the Bundesliga, Serie A and Major League Soccer. Some think the introduction of VAR at the highest level of football is something that has been long overdue, while others claim that its use is too premature – with the potential to disrupt the flow of the game.Regardless of views, VAR is to be used at the sport’s showcase event this summer in Russia, and Goal takes a look at all the details of how it will work, as well its regulations – including retrospective punishment. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Out of his depth! Emery on borrowed time after another abysmal Arsenal display Diving, tactical fouls & the emerging war of words between Guardiola & Klopp Sorry, Cristiano! Pjanic is Juventus’ most important player right now Arsenal would be selling their soul with Mourinho move How will VAR work at the World Cup? Instances of using the VAR are pretty straightforward, and will be used in similar fashion as in the Bundesliga and MLS. Referees in Russia will be able to consult the VAR for help on four sorts of decisions: goals, penalty decisions, direct red cards and cases of mistaken identity.Regulations state that the referee must always be the one to make the decision and that decision will stand until it is “clearly wrong”. The referee will only be able to view, on video, the start of the phase that has led to the incident, and a goal scored through a throw-in which should have gone to the other team will not be disallowed under the new VAR system.Furthermore, if the ball is still in play, the referee must wait until it is in a neutral zone before stopping all course of action. The play will then restart with a drop ball if the decision is not overturned. One example in a World Cup final where VAR might have overturned a missed call was in the round of 16 fixture at the 2002 World Cup in South Korea and Japan between the United States and Germany. With Germany leading 1-0 in the second half, USMNT defender Gregg Berhalter stuck a shot that beat Germany goalkeeper Oliver Kahn but struck midfielder Torsten Frings hand on the goal line. Had a handball been called, it would have been a red card for Frings with the USMNT receiving a penalty for a chance to level the scoreline. Instead, no call was made and Germany went on to hold on for the 1-0, and an eventual trip to that year’s final. While the referee of that match claimed he did not think it was a deliberate handball in real time, former Premier League referee Howard Webb, who also refereed the 2010 World Cup final, told Sports Illustrated in 2017 the correct outcome of the play should have been a red card and penalty kick. What are some VAR concerns? There has been a fair amount of criticism about the introduction of VAR at the World Cup, with some stating that referees constantly checking the video assistant would disrupt play and, at times, the process can be a very delayed. Fans, coaches and spectators attending the matches are also left in the dark when the referee is checking the VAR.Tottenham manager Mauricio Pochettino criticised the use of the VAR in the Carabao Cup and FA Cup fixtures this past season, denoting his fears about how the use of technology would kill the emotion and ethos of the game.”It is a game of emotion. If we are going to kill this emotion I think we are going to change the game,” he told reporters.”It’s difficult for the referee – I feel so sorry for the referee and more I feel sorry for the fans because it’s so difficult to understand the situation.”Additionally, UEFA president Aleksander Ceferin said that VAR will not be used in next season’s Champions League.”Nobody knows exactly how VAR will work. There is already a lot of confusion,” said Ceferin.”I am not at all against it but we must better explain when it will be used. We will see at the World Cup.”How will retrospective action work?Referees in Russia will be allowed to give out red cards for off-the-ball incidents through VAR. This means that players can be sent off if incidents are picked up on by monitors.IFAB (International Football Association Board) technical director David Elleray stated: “If there is something away from the action that has been missed and it later comes to the attention of the VAR or the assistant VAR, then they can inform the referee and he can send the player off, even if it is later in the match.”We do not anticipate this happening very often… this would only be for serious red-card offences.”The World Cup will start on June 14.last_img read more

2017 Youth Trans Tasman Referee Appointments

first_imgRelated LinksYTT Referee Appointments Congratulations to the following referees who received appointments at the 2017 Youth Trans Tasman.Game 1: Friday 20 January 201718 Mixed: John Wright, Luke Saldern and Dai Tui Taylor18 Women’s: Chris Schwerdt, Henri Labuschagne and Brian Blechynden18 Men’s: Luke Heckendorf, John Dustow and Anthony Smith20 Mixed: Rob Bowen, George Haswell and Tony Calabria20 Women’s: Alisha Ruaiti, Logan Forrester and Amanda Sheeky20 Men’s: Luke McKenzie, Cameron MacDonald and Richie HeapGame 2: Saturday 21 January 201718 Mixed: Logan Forrester, Brian Blechynden and Luke Saldern18 Women’s: Dali Tui Taylor, Henri Labuschange and John Wright18 Men’s: Luke Heckendorf, John Dustow and Chris Schwerdt 20 Mixed: Rob Bowen, George Haswell and Anthony Smith20 Women’s: Tony Calabria, Alisha Ruaiti and Amanada Sheeky20 Men’s: Luke McKenzie, Cameron MacDonald and Richie Heap Game 3: Sunday 22 January 201718 Mixed: Logan Forrester, Brian Blechynden and Luke Saldern18 Women’s: Dali Tui Taylor, Henri Labuschange and John Wright18 Men’s: Luke Heckendorf, John Dustow and Chris Schwerdt 20 Mixed: Rob Bowen, George Haswell and Anthony Smith20 Women’s: Tony Calabria, Alisha Ruaiti and Amanada Sheeky20 Men’s: Luke McKenzie, Cameron MacDonald and Richie Heap last_img read more

10 months agoDean Holdsworth joins management team of Palermo

first_imgDean Holdsworth joins management team of Palermoby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Bolton Wanderers striker Dean Holdsworth has joined the management team of Palermo.David Platt, formerly of Juventus and Sampdoria, has also been assisting the club’s new owners.It was announced over the weekend:”Sport Capital Group Investments Ltd (a wholly owned subsidiary of Sport Capital Group Ltd) has today completed the acquisition of 100% of the shares of US Città di Palermo Spa, through the completion of the previously announced preliminary contract dated 30th November.”At a shareholders’ general meeting of US Città di Palermo Spa a new board of directors shall be nominated, with Clive Richardson as President, Emanuele Facile as Chief Executive and John Treacy as third director. The new board and a group of senior football advisors lead by Dean Holdsworth will be working on plans for the remainder of the 2018-19 Season with the current management team. “Sport Capital Group Investments Ltd will in the coming days be calling a shareholder meeting to increase its share capital to up to €20m.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Second Quarter Results Released

first_imgThe Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation (NSLC) released its second quarter results today, Dec. 3. For the three-month period from July 2 to Sept. 30, the NSLC recorded sales of $169.0 million compared to sales of $166.5 million for the same period last year, an increase of 1.5 per cent. NSLC’s second quarter net income was $65.9 million, an increase of $700,000, or 1.1 per cent, compared to second quarter last year. This quarter had one less selling day than the same period last year. A detailed news release can be found by following the News Releases link on the NSLC website at www.myNSLC.com. -30-last_img