RSF supports journalist fired by Bulgaria’s national radio

first_img News Organisation Receive email alerts News Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on Bulgaria’s state-owned national radio broadcaster to reinstate Lili Marinkova, a leading journalist who was wrongfully dismissed without warning last month, and condemns the harassment of journalists by the country’s politicians. RSF reiterates its support for Marinkova, one of Bulgaria National Radio’s most famous and outspoken journalists. Last month RSF signed a petition launched by other well-known journalists, who called for her reinstatement because they regarded her dismissal as politically-motivated. A formal request for her reinstatement has been submitted to the national radio broadcaster’s board of governors, which is due to take a decision in the next few days. The radio broadcaster’s management said Marinkova, 62, was let go because she had reached retirement age. But her dismissal coincided with Alexander Velev’s appointment by the Electronic Media Council, a regulatory body, as the broadcaster’s new boss. It is clear that Marinkova, who never minces her words or handles politicians with kid gloves, was deliberately taken off the airwaves ahead of upcoming elections. In one of her last broadcasts, she talked about the origins of Delyan Peevski, a legislator, leading cigaratte manufacturer and media tycoon who is described in RSF’s new report about oligarchs (read the report). “We cannot tolerate such an obvious act of censorship,” said Pauline Adès-Mével, the head of RSF’s EU-Balkans desk. “Marinkova’s departure was not prompted by any fall in her programme’s ratings or any other objective criteria. This was a blatant act of censorship and must be redressed by the radio broadcaster’s management without delay.” At the start of this month, culture minister Vezhdi Rashidov tried to intimidate a journalist. After state TV presenter Georgi Angelov interviewed a sculptor critical of the minister, Rashidov said Angelov should be “less ironical about the government” and should “remember who pays his salary.” The Association of European Journalists reacted immediately, accusing the minister of pressuring and blackmailing Angelov. A demonstration was held in Sofia on 7 July to demand the departure of Rashidov, who finally issued an apology. Atanas Chobanos, one of the joint editors of the Bulgarian news website Bivol.bg, commented: “Marinkova’s dismissal and the ‘Sunday 150’ programme’s removal, and the culture minister’s attack on a state TV journalist are symptoms of the political authorities’ same illness, which has resulted in Bulgaria being ranked last in media freedom in the European Union.” Bulgaria is ranked 113th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2016 World Press Freedom Index. RSF_en July 22, 2016 RSF supports journalist fired by Bulgaria’s national radio March 10, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Bulgaria Help by sharing this information BulgariaEurope – Central Asia Media independence Freedom of expression RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive February 11, 2021 Find out more Bulgaria: RSF condemns refusal to investigate reporter’s violent arrest News News Bulgaria’s general election: RSF publishes 10 proposals to rescue press freedom Crédit: Nadezhda Chipeva to go further BulgariaEurope – Central Asia Media independence Freedom of expression December 2, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Gaddafi calls for release of all detained journalists

first_img News November 9, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Gaddafi calls for release of all detained journalists Reporters Without Borders welcomes last night’s report on state television that Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi has given instructions for the release of all the journalists held in a wave of arrests since 3 November (http://en.rsf.org/libye-wave-of-arrests-of-journalists-who-08-11-2010,38776.html).Issued on the eve of a periodic review of Libya’s record by the United Nations Human Rights Council, the orders for their release unfortunately reflect Col. Gaddafi’s desire to stay in power while normalising political relations with Libya’s economic partners rather than any consideration for freedom of expression.Reporters Without Borders hopes that the announcement is quickly followed by the release of all the detained journalists.————09/11/2010Blow against freedom of expressionWave of arrests of journalists who urged return of opposition figuresReporters Without Borders today strongly condemned a wave of arrests by Libya’s secret services of around 30 journalists that began on 5 November 2010.The roundup followed the publication of an editorial in the daily Oea and the news agency Libyan Press calling for opponents and former comrades-in-arms of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi in the 1969 revolution living in exile abroad, to return to the country and take an active role in politics.The worldwide press freedom organisation condemned the arrests and called for the immediate release of the journalists, saying that it was the reaction of a draconian state, deaf to the need for protecting human rights and democratic freedoms. It demonstrated that the regime was determined to be intractable in relation to freedom of expression.The two media belong to the media foundation al-Ghad, owned by Seif al-Islam Gaddafi, son of Colonel Gaddafi. The director of the foundation, Mr Dogha, who lives in London, was warned that he would be arrested if he returned to the country. Oea was banned from appearing on 3 November 2010, when the people’s public committee (the government) ordered the national printers to shelve printing the weekly. Websites Libya al-Yom and the Libyan League for Human Rights run by opponents of the regime living abroad, were shut down on the same day. Another website, al-Manara Lili’lem was hacked into and made inaccessible, on 4 November 2010. It is now up and running again and covering current news event. Around ten journalists were arrested in the capital, Tripoli, overnight on 5-6 November. Fresh arrests continued elsewhere in the country in the following days. To date, around 28 journalists are being detained at al-Sika prison in the capital. Among them are an Egyptian and a Tunisian journalist, both women. The arrests have taken place against a background of rising tension in Libya between reformers and conservatives. Top ranking members of the Revolutionary Council recently called for violence against supporters of what they called “a reformist tsunami in the country”. The UN Human Rights Council is tomorrow due to carry out its Universal Periodic Review of Libya. Reporters Without Borders has contributed to this review by releasing its own assessment of the state of press freedom in Libya (see: http://en.rsf.org/libye-reporters-without-borders-08-11-2010,38768.html). Libya is ranked 160th out of 178 countries in Reporters Without Borders’ press freedom index for 2010. June 24, 2020 Find out more Follow the news on Libya News Receive email alerts Well-known Libyan journalist missing since his arrest LibyaMiddle East – North Africa News Help by sharing this information center_img Organisation RSF_en February 23, 2021 Find out more to go further On Libyan revolution’s 10th anniversary, authorities urged to guarantee press freedom News Six imprisoned journalists to finally appear in court in Istanbul LibyaMiddle East – North Africa December 17, 2019 Find out morelast_img read more

Bill Clinton leaves Pyongyang with pardoned US journalists

first_imgNews North KoreaAsia – Pacific Help by sharing this information August 5, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Bill Clinton leaves Pyongyang with pardoned US journalists RSF_en to go further Follow the news on North Korea November 18, 2019 Find out more News Organisation The two journalists described their capture in a statement posted on the Current TV website on 3 September: click here ——————Reporters Without Borders hails today’s release of American journalists Laura Ling and Euna Lee, who were arrested by North Korea on 17 March and were sentenced to 12 years in a labour camp in June on charges of “serious crimes” and trying to defame the regime. They were freed a day after US President Bill Clinton’s surprise arrival in Pyongyang.“We are relieved by the release of these two journalists, which underscores the fact that the charges against them were baseless,” Reporters Without Borders said. “But we must not forget that a third journalist, Korean national Kim Seong-cheol, is still being held by the authorities. North Korea continues to be one of the world’s most totalitarian regimes and its population is denied the most basic rights.”After flying yesterday to Pyongyang to seek the release of Ling and Lee, the former US president met with North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il. The North Korean news agency KCNA said Bill Clinton gave him an apology over dinner and Kim responded by granting the two journalists a “special pardon.” The US administration has denied that Clinton gave any apology.Clinton, Ling and Lee left Pyongyang this morning in a chartered jet and made a stopover in a US military base in Japan before setting off again for Los Angeles. A US official said the two women were in very good health.Ling, 32, and Lee, 36, work for California-based Current TV. At the time of their arrest, they were investigating the trafficking of North Korean women across the border between North Korea and China.center_img Campaigns News North KoreaAsia – Pacific Journalists face archaic sanction of capital punishment in some parts of the world As doubt persists on North Korea’s “zero” coronavirus cases, RSF urges for transparency July 6, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts April 1, 2020 Find out more “Without independent journalism, this would be the news” – RSF’s new adlast_img read more

Mayoral candidate and supporters beat up radio presenter during live broadcast

first_img Organisation RSF_en Reporters Without Borders voiced shock today at the action of a mayoral candidate and dozens of his supporters yesterday in bursting into the studios of radio La Divertida in Tulancingo (in the central province of Hidalgo) and beating up Jorge Zamacona Ramírez as he was presenting a programme going out live.“It is unacceptable that there is such a degree of impunity for press freedom violations that a candidate for the post of mayor thinks it is safe for him to openly assault a journalist on the air for referring to alleged irregularities in his party,” the organisation said, demanding a serious investigation into the case.The attack was led by Ricardo Bravo, the candidate of the opposition Democratic Revolution Party (PRD), who was accompanied by about 60 supporters while another 40 waited outside, Zamacona said. Bravo reportedly told Zamacona, “you will not get out of here alive.” The PRD supporters then allegedly beat him up, leaving him seriously injured. Zamacona said the attack was a reprisal for his having broadcast details of documents that were compromising for the PRD and which, in particular, related to alleged fraud and breach of trust by members of Bravo’s family. November 10, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Mayoral candidate and supporters beat up radio presenter during live broadcast to go further May 13, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on Mexico Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state Reports Help by sharing this information center_img News 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies News MexicoAmericas May 5, 2021 Find out more April 28, 2021 Find out more MexicoAmericas Receive email alerts NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs saylast_img read more

Multiple kidnappings of media workers

first_img Read in Arabic (بالعربية)Reporters Without Borders expressed grave concern about recent violent attacks on Libyan journalists, whose safety conditions are deteriorating drastically.The free press organization demanded that the Libyan transitional government do everything in its power to guarantee the security of local and foreign media workers.On 28 April, armed militiamen kidnapped Mahmoud Al-Farjani, correspondent for Al-Arabiya, seizing him in the Saudi-owned network’s office, which lies across the street from the Foreign Ministry. He was covering a militia demonstration in favour of highly controversial legislation to ban from politics former senior officials who served deposed dictator Muammar Gaddafi.Al-Farjani was held for seven hours. His kidnappers beat him repeatedly and threatened to kill him. Before the kidnapping, the journalist had already received numerous threats arising from his work.At the same time, an Iraqi journalist and a Turkish technician for the IHA Turkish network were taken by another armed group, apparently one not linked to the militia involved in the Al-Farjani kidnapping. The two were released after several hours and were not mistreated.That same day, armed militia members occupied the headquarters of the national television network, Al-Wataniya, for several hours.On 22 April, Yousef Bargoum, a former journalist who directs public information for the civil registry in Benghazi, was kidnapped by armed militia after a radio broadcast on Al-Manar in which he disclosed obvious irregularities in municipal documents. Bargoum was held for three days. He was badly beaten and tortured with electrical shocks during the ordeal. He recounted the experience in an interview with journalist Mabrouka al-Masmari.Bargoum was released on 25 April and immediately hospitalized. But he quickly left the hospital, fearing his life was in danger in an insecure setting.Reporters Without Borders reiterated the important role that media workers play in a democratic society, emphasizing that freedom of information is critical to the establishment of a new, democratic, transparent and pluralist Libya.The organization cited the UN Human Rights Committee, which noted in its “General comment No. 34” in 2011: “Freedom of opinion and freedom of expression are indispensable conditions for the full development of the person. They are essential for any society. The two freedoms are closely related, with freedom of expression providing the vehicle for the exchange and development of opinions.” On Libyan revolution’s 10th anniversary, authorities urged to guarantee press freedom Organisation February 23, 2021 Find out more to go further RSF_en Related documents 130429_cp_libye_ar-2.pdfPDF – 290.61 KB LibyaMiddle East – North Africa Help by sharing this information April 29, 2013 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Multiple kidnappings of media workers Follow the news on Libya December 17, 2019 Find out more LibyaMiddle East – North Africa June 24, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts News News Six imprisoned journalists to finally appear in court in Istanbul News News Well-known Libyan journalist missing since his arrestlast_img read more

Government blamed for newspaper reporter’s dismissal

first_img June 7, 2021 Find out more RSF_en News Reporters Without Borders also hopes that the Grenada Advocate will reverse its decision to fire Titus.In the 9 March article that apparently prompted his dismissal, Titus reported that the prime minister had selected the ruling National Democratic Congress’ candidates for the next general elections without bothering to consult with the party’s leaders. Other media have since carried reports that tend to support his claim.The prime minister’s press secretary, Richard Simon, wrote twice to the Grenada Advocate requesting a retraction and apology. It was after receipt of the second letter – of which we have been sent the text of key passages – that Titus was told that his contract would end on 31 March.The MWAG has told us that this is not the first case of its kind. Two radio stations also recently received warnings from the prime minister’s office about their political reporting, the association said.Although the Organization of East Caribbean States (OECS), to which Grenada belongs, achieved a good ranking (25th) in the latest Reporters Without Borders press freedom index, cases of direct political pressure on journalists or their news media are occasionally reported.There has, however, not been a case of this gravity since the Grenada Today weekly had to be liquidated in 2009 as a result of a libel suit by former prime minister Keith Mitchell. 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies June 3, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information Reports Organisation WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists Americas Newscenter_img Receive email alerts Americas Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says March 27, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Government blamed for newspaper reporter’s dismissal There are strong grounds for suspecting that the privately-owned Grenada Advocate weekly’s dismissal of reporter Rawle Titus on 23 March was the result of direct political pressure by Prime Minister Tillman Thomas (photo) and his press secretary. Reporters Without Borders calls on the government to provide a frank explanation of a matter liable to endanger media independence.“We understand the alarm expressed by the Media Workers Association of Grenada (MWAG) ever since the Grenada Advocate told Titus his contract with was being terminated,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The evidence brought to our notice is solid enough to substantiate the claim that there was direct political interference in the functioning of a reputable independent newspaper.“We urge Prime Minister Thomas to disown the pressure that his office brought to bear on the Grenada Advocate’s management and to reiterate the commitment to freedom of information that he expressed when he took office in 2008.” to go further Follow the news on Americas Related documents Prime minister’s responsePDF – 1.4 MB News May 13, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Radio host gets six years in prison

first_img Follow the news on Uzbekistan Organisation RSF_en May 11, 2021 Find out more February 11, 2021 Find out more New press freedom predators elected to UN Human Rights Council More than six years in prison for Uzbek blogger who covered corruption Uzbek blogger facing possible 10-year jail term News News UzbekistanEurope – Central Asia center_img May 28, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Radio host gets six years in prison News News UzbekistanEurope – Central Asia Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders condemns the six-year jail sentence that a court in Tashkent passed today on Khayrullo Khamidov, a popular radio host, poet and sports commentator. Khamidov’s trial, held behind closed doors, ended on 11 May but the sentencing was postponed three times for unknown reasons.Detained since last January, Khamidov was convicted on a charge of belonging to a banned Muslim organisation under article 216 of the criminal code, concerning “the organisation or active participation in a proscribed social or religious movement.” Reporters Without Borders believes the charge was trumped up with the aim of intimidating and silencing both journalists and government opponents. The government persecutes its opponents relentlessly. At least 11 journalists are currently held in Uzbekistan’s prisons, in which, according to many reports, torture is virtually systematic. The sentence imposed on Khamidov confirms Uzbekistan’s status as Europe’s biggest prison for the media.Khamidov is well-known in Uzbekistan because of his various radio programmes, in which he often referred to Islam. But he never advocated violence and none of his activities could be regarded as proscribed. His conviction is the act of a paranoid state that just wanted to prevent him from working.Khamidov was arrested on 21 January in a pre-dawn raid by police who searched his home thoroughly and removed books, CDs and his computer. In his show “Kholislik Sari” (Voice of Impartiality), a programme on semi-privately-owned radio Navruz with a large audience throughout the country and among Uzbek minorities in neighbouring countries, Khamidov offered advice based on traditional Islamic values to listeners in distress.In so doing, he shed light on issues that are generally ignored in the official media – public health problems, corruption, prostitution and the country’s social and moral crisis.His lawyers plan to file an appeal in an attempt to get his sentence reduced. Eighteen other people were tried with him. Five of them were given sentences of five or six years in prison while the other 13 were acquitted. Help by sharing this information to go further October 15, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Emergency centre of operations for journalists nearly ready, but will need broader help to keep going in mid-term

first_img June 11, 2019 Find out more January 20, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Emergency centre of operations for journalists nearly ready, but will need broader help to keep going in mid-term Reporters Without Borders and the Canadian media group Quebecor are in the process of installing an emergency centre of operations for Haitian journalists in the Port-au-Prince neighbourhood of Canapé-Vert. Located on Cheriez Street, the centre will have communications equipment provided by Quebecor. A second equipment convoy is due to arrive today from the Dominican Republic.The centre’s priority aim is to provide journalists who have not been able to work since the earthquake with essential means of communication. It is also intended to facilitate contact between media representatives and to provide government officials, politicians and NGOs with a a way to communicate with the Haitian media.The Canapé-Vert centre also aims to provide a service to international news media seeking to understand Haitian reality, and could eventually produce and disseminate news and information in its own right by, for example, employing journalists with Haitian print media whose distribution has been suspended as a result of the earthquake.Up to 20 journalists will be able to work in the centre at any one time. It also has a news conference room that can hold 40 people and a terrace that can hold 60 people. It will have broadband Internet, telephone lines, an audio and video conference system, a satellite TV link and printers, as well as facilities for journalists in distress.The centre is meant to relay Haitian journalists’ requests to the international community and to help evaluate the reconstruction needs of Haitian news media and the assistance needs of individual journalists and their families.The setting-up of the Emergency centre of operations is possible due tothe grateful support of the Roland Berger Foundation. To be able to continue operating in the medium term, the centre will need technical and financial assistance from other NGOs, international bodies and foreign media. We would like to draw this need to the particular attention of the governments of the five countries with especially close links with Haiti: Canada, France, Brazil, Mexico and the United States, as well the Spanish presidency of the EU. We reiterate our appeal for donations and technical assistance. Help us to help Haitian journalists.With the support of November 14, 2019 Find out more Receive email alerts HaïtiAmericas News Organisation Follow the news on Haïti to go further Newscenter_img HaïtiAmericas Journalist shot dead amid anti-government protests in Haiti Help by sharing this information October 11, 2019 Find out more News RSF_en Violence against the press in Haiti: RSF and CPJ write to Minister of Justice Another journalist murdered in Haiti Newslast_img read more

Improvement in press freedom depends on national unity government’s ability to function properly

first_img November 12, 2020 Find out more to go further Help by sharing this information ZimbabweAfrica Reporters Without Borders has written to Tomás Salomão, the executive secretary of the Southern African Development Community, on the eve of a SADC meeting in Maputo on the situation in Zimbabwe. Voicing concern about the impact of the Zimbabwean government’s internal crisis on the ability of journalists to work freely and the reemergence of an independent press, Reporters Without Borders urges the SADC and the leaders of Mozambique, Swaziland and Zambia to spare no effort to help the government emerge from the current deadlock.Mr. Tomaz SalomaoExecutive SecretarySouthern African Development CommunityGaborone – BotswanaParis, 4 November 2009Dear Executive Secretary,On the eve of the SADC summit that you will be chairing in Maputo on the situation in Zimbabwe, Reporters Without Borders, an international press freedom organisation, would like to draw your attention to the terrible consequences that political deadlock in Zimbabwe could have on the work of the news media.An increase in tension in the past three weeks between President Robert Mugabe’s ZANU-PF and Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) has already had a negative impact on the state of press freedom and could lead to serious reversals.An Al Jazeera TV crew was detained for several hours at the president’s office on 20 October, when the prime minister boycotted a cabinet meeting for the first time. Three days later, the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation and several state-owned newspapers received orders from information minister Webster Shamu to stop covering the activities of government ministers who are MDC members.Finally, a climate of fear has taken hold within the journalistic community as a result of recent arrests of civil society members.Meanwhile, the Zimbabwe Media Council (ZMC), a new entity that is supposed to issue licences to newspapers and thereby facilitate the independent press’s rebirth, is currently unable to function. Some sources say that, after long and delicate negotiations, the president and prime minister reached agreement on the ZMC’s nine members but they have not yet been appointed and may not be if the crisis within the government continues.An improvement in the ability of journalists to work freely and the reemergence of an independent press in Zimbabwe depend very closely on the national unity government’s ability to function properly. Given the current tension between the two sides, we think regional mediation and the SADC’s role will be decisive. We therefore urge you and the leaders of Mozambique, Swaziland and Zambia to spare no effort to help the government emerge from the current deadlock.We trust you will give this request your careful consideration.Sincerely,Jean-François JulliardSecretary-General Zimbabwean journalist Hopewell Chin’ono denied bail Organisation September 1, 2020 Find out more News Reports The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africacenter_img RSF_en November 27, 2020 Find out more November 4, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Improvement in press freedom depends on national unity government’s ability to function properly ZimbabweAfrica Receive email alerts Zimbabwean court must free imprisoned journalist who is unwell News Follow the news on Zimbabwe Newslast_img read more

The 11 commandments of the Internet in China

first_img News June 2, 2021 Find out more ChinaAsia – Pacific China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures ChinaAsia – Pacific Organisation to go further A study published by OpenNet on 5 July contains an interesting analysis of a law introduced last September to regulate online activity which Reporters Without Borders at the time dubbed the “11 Commandments of the Internet.” OpenNet explains how the law makes it impossible to set up an independent news website.The law distinguishes between three kinds of informational websites. The first encompasses authorised sites with a government licence which just republish news and information already disseminated by the official media. They must be registered with the authorities and obey the “11 commandments” and must not make any changes to the articles they reproduce.The second category consists of sites that carry not only reports from official sources but also reports and information that is only posted on the Internet and which they gather in an independent fashion. These sites must only cover subjects for which they have been officially accredited and must employ at least five full-time editors with at least three years’ experience with an official news agency. These restrictions above all concern Chinese web portals such as Sina.com and Sohu.com.The third category comprises all other sites. They are not only subject to the restrictions imposed on the first two categories but are also banned from publishing articles based on information which they themselves have gathered. They must employ at least 10 editors of whom five must have at least three years’ experience with an official news agency, and they must be registered by an entity with at least 10 million yuan (about 1 million euros) in capital.The full text in chinese—————-“You shall not spread rumours”, “You shall not damage state security”, “You shall not destroy the country’s reputation”. There are just three of the 11 commandments ordered by Beijing, on 25 September, aimed at bloggers and websites managers.Reporters Without Borders expressed concern at this latest turn of the screw in an ongoing crackdown on freedom of expression.”The Chinese authorities never seem to let up on their desire to regulate the Web and their determination to control information available on it ever more tightly,” the worldwide press freedom organisation said.“These new rules, announced with a fanfare by the official media, are certainly more intended to frighten Internet-users than to codify the use of the Net,” it said. “In fact there is nothing really new in these 11 commandments, which simply repeat that the party has the monopoly of the dissemination of information and that the media’s task is not to be objective but to relay state propaganda.“These moves to filter the Internet are nevertheless a sign that the Internet frightens those in power, in particular during a period of ever greater social unrest. It’s noticeable that the only new elements in the text relate to banning the calling of strikes or gatherings though the Net,” it said.The new rules, ordered by the state council information bureau and ministry of industry and information, are aimed at bringing into line all previous such edicts. According to the Chinese daily Beijing news (thebeijingnews.com), it contains 11 subjects forbidden to online editors. They are banned from putting out news that:- violates the basic principles of the Chinese constitution:- endangers national security, leaks national secrets, seeks to overthrow the government, endangers the unification of the country;- destroys the country’s reputation and benefits;- arouses national feelings of hatred, racism, and endangers racial unification;- violates national policies on religion, promotes the propaganda of sects and superstition; (Reporters Without Borders note: More than 30 members of the spiritual Falungong movement are currently behind bars for posting news on the Internet)- diffuses rumours, endangers public order and creates social uncertainty;- diffuses information that is pornographic, violent, terrorist or linked to gambling;- libels or harms people’s reputation, violates people’s legal rights;- includes illegal information bounded by law and administrative rules.Two completely new bans have been added to the nine rules above:- It is forbidden to encourage illegal gatherings, strikes, etc to create public disorder;- It is forbidden to organise activities under illegal social associations or organisations.Websites that break these new rules will be shut down and those running them will have to pay a fine that could reach 30,000 yuans (3,000 euros).Reporters Without Borders points out that 62 people are currently imprisoned in China for having posted articles on the Internet that the authorities deemed to be “subversive”. News RSF_en News March 12, 2021 Find out more China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison News September 26, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 The 11 commandments of the Internet in China April 27, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information Follow the news on China “You shall not spread rumours”, “You shall not damage state security”, “You shall not destroy the country’s reputation”. There are just three of the 11 commandments ordered by Beijing, on 25 September, aimed at bloggers and websites managers. Reporters Without Borders expressed concern at this latest turn of the screw in an ongoing crackdown on freedom of expression. Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes Receive email alertslast_img read more